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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. High income countries issue brief: rights of children and young people to access HIV-related services

    This brief focuses on the rights of children (minors under the age of 18 years) in high-income countries to access health services related to HIV prevention – in particular sexual and reproductive health services, and harm reduction services and drug treatment services. …

  2. Programs to address child marriage: Framing the problem

    Child marriage violates girls’ human rights and adversely affects their health and well-being. While age at marriage is increasing in most regions of the developing world, early marriage persists for large populations. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one out of three women aged 20–24 were married before age 18, and one out of seven were married before age 15. There is great variation in child marriage practices across and within regions and between ethnic and religious groups. Eradicating child marriage has long been on the agenda of the United Nations and of individual countries. …

  3. Guatemala country case study: child rights

    Guatemala has a legal basis for the protection of children and young people and ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1990, which was domesticated in 2003 with the passage of the Law on the Integral Protection of Children and Adolescence. This study asks what factors and conditions have generated positive results of Norwegian and Swedish assistance to promote child rights in Guatemala. The evaluation is concerned with specifying strategies and interventions that function well, as well as with identifying gaps and failures in existing policy and practice.

  4. Education of children with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has enabled more children and youths to attend school and participate in school activities. Children and youths with HIV infection should receive the same education as those with other chronic illnesses. They may require special services, including home instruction, to provide continuity of education. Confidentiality about HIV infection status should be maintained with parental consent required for disclosure. Youths also should assent or consent as is appropriate for disclosure of their diagnosis.

  5. An assessment: the situation of children made vulnerable or orphaned in Guyana

    The social and economic factors contributing to children of Guyana becoming orphaned or made vulnerable have been cause for major concern. Increasingly, children suffer in various ways; some from abuse, others are exposed to various forms of violence, neglected or abandoned, and also have to face the challenge of them or their parents dealing with life threatening diseases such as cancer and HIV. …

  6. Intersecting Risks: HIV/AIDS and Child Labour

    This paper analyses the mutally reinforcing factors that, as a result of HIV infection among adults, contribute to child labour and may place child workers at risk of HIV infection themselves. In some instances, these contextual factors run parallel; in others, they intersect, thereby putting working children at greater risk of HIV infection or of suffering the consequences of infection.

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