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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Is peer education the best approach for HIV prevention in schools? Findings from a randomized controlled trial

    The purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of peer education when compared to teacher-led curricula in AIDS prevention programs conducted in schools in Rome, Italy. The only apparent benefit of the peer-led intervention, compared to that led by teachers, was a greater improvement in knowledge of HIV. Neither of the interventions induced changes in sexual behavior. However, the role of possible biases and methodological problems must be considered when interpreting these results.

  2. Addressing sexual violence and HIV risk among married adolescent girls in rural Nyanza, Kenya

    HIV infection is much higher among adolescent girls in sub-Saharan Africa than among boys. In settings such as Nyanza Province, Kenya, rates of HIV infection are extremely high, and evidence is increasing in some settings that girls who are married are much more likely to be infected with HIV, compared with their unmarried sexually active counterparts. This brief describes a program addressing the problem of sexual violence and the risk of HIV transmission within marriage in Kenya's Nyanza Province. …

  3. These days virginity is just a feeling: heterosexuality and change in young urban Vietnamese men

    This paper argues that young Vietnamese men's beliefs around women's changing sexual identities and habits generate some anxiety around their own heterosexual abilities, while contributing to growing doubts around 'traditional' masculine advantage within sexual relations. It explores this notion in regard to eight Vietnamese men aged 18-30 years, interviewed over 13 months of fieldwork in Hanoi, Vietnam. …

  4. Delaying sexual debut amongst out-of-school youth in rural southwest Uganda

    This paper focuses on sexual debut among out-of-school youth in Masaka District, Uganda; factors influencing its timing; and assistance young people feel they need to delay sexual initiation. Data were drawn from a needs assessment using applied anthropological techniques with young people ages 13-19 years. Parents, guardians, and community leaders were also consulted. All participants felt that young people begin their sexual lives too early. Young men feel under pressure from friends and older men to prove their masculinity. …

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