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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Talk what others think you can’t talk: HIV/AIDS clubs as peer education in Ugandan schools

    In this article, we make the case that HIV/AIDS clubs in Ugandan schools provide valuable information to students who may not have easy access to health services. As one club motto suggests, the clubs ‘talk what others think you can’t talk’. The innovative peer education methods, which include drama, popular culture and community outreach all have great appeal to youth, and provide unique opportunities for female students to raise gender issues and develop leadership skills. …

  2. HIV/AIDS in the workplace: a case study from higher education

    Purpose – This paper seeks to highlight the nature and possible effect of the South African higher education (HE) sector’s human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) workplace programmes response and progress. Design/methodology/approach – A discourse approach is employed within the contextualization of the role of the South African higher education institution (HEI) in addressing the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Findings – The focus of wellness is rapidly becoming part of any corporate landscape and institutions of HE are an integral part of this landscape. …

  3. Vulnerability in AIDS-affected states: rethinking child rights, educational institutions and development paradigms

    The article interrogates current international development constructs of childhood, rights, vulnerability, and schooling in light of the daily experiences of two Malawian children affected by HIV/AIDS. It aims to better understand how development efforts targeted at these children function in practice, and suggests that current development discourses and frameworks may sometimes operate to make the lives of vulnerable children and communities harder and less secure. …

  4. Community-based HIV/AIDS education in rural Uganda: which channel is most effective?

    This analysis looks at aáprocess evaluation of four channels of delivery (drama, video, community education and leaflets) used in an Information, Education and Communication (IEC) intervention on HIV/AIDS in rural Uganda. Semi-structured interviews (n=37) and focus groups (n=3) were conducted among field staff. Two questionnaires (n=105 and n=69) and focus groups were conducted with community members. More than 85% of the community had seen at least one drama or video and saw them as relevant and realistic. However, the overall message of the plays was often not well understood. …

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