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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Do information technologies improve teenagers' sexual education? Evidence from a randomized evaluation in Colombia

    Across public junior high schools in 21 Colombian cities, we conducted a randomized evaluation of a mandatory six-month internet-based sexual education course. Six months after finishing the course, we find a 0.4 standard deviation improvement in knowledge, a 0.2 standard deviation improvement in attitudes, and a 55% increase in the likelihood of redeeming vouchers for condoms as a result of taking the course. …

  2. The association between sex education and youth’s engagement in sexual intercourse, age at first intercourse, and birth control use at first sex

    Purpose: Sex education is intended to provide youth with the information and skills needed to make healthy and informed decisions about sex. This study examined whether exposure to formal sex education is associated with three sexual behaviors: ever had sexual intercourse, age at first episode of sexual intercourse, and use of birth control at first intercourse. Methods: Data used were from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth, a nationally representativesurvey. The sample included 2019 never-married males and females aged 15–19 years. …

  3. Youth in a void: sexuality, HIV/AIDS and communication in Kenyan public schools

    The disappearance of traditional sex education during rites of passage in African societies has left many youth uncertain of where to look for information. Against this backcloth, the objectives of this study were to identify knowledge gaps amongst adolescents in Kenya regarding sexuality, HIV/AIDS and reproductive health. A thematic analysis was conducted of questions posed by 735 school youth aged 12–18 years from Meru and Kajiado Districts. Results show that many questions showed curiosity and anxiousness. …

  4. Sex and relationship education: views from teachers, parents and governors

    Almost 1,500 school leaders, school governors and parents of school-aged children were asked for their views on the current provision of SRE and how the topic should be delivered in future. Key findings. There was a very high level of agreement between parents, school leaders and governors about SRE provision. More than nine out of 10 parents, and approximately eight out of 10 school leaders and governors agreed that it was 'very important' for children to receive information on practising safer sex and always using contraception. …

  5. Love only after classes: needs assessment on sexuality education in Macedonia

    In Macedonia there is a need for introducing sexuality education in schools. This finding is a result of a research determining the needs of the parents, teachers and students, and reviewing the current school curricula. Both parents and teachers agree on the introduction of sexuality education as a regular subject in schools. Such subject, among others, must develop the practical skills for protection from risks related to sexual activity. …

  6. The application of Intervention Mapping in developing and implementing school-based sexuality and HIV/AIDS education in a developing country context: the case of Tanzania

    Effective sexuality and HIV/AIDS education programmes are needed to protect young people against HIV/AIDS and teenage pregnancy in Tanzania and other Sub-Saharan African countries. Using a theory- and evidence-based approach and adapting the programmes to local contexts, increases the effectiveness of these programmes. This paper describes and discusses the challenges and opportunities concerning the application of Intervention Mapping (IM) in the development and implementation of a sexuality and HIV/AIDS education programme targeting young people aged 12-14 in Tanzania. …

  7. The voices and identities of Botswana's school children. Gender, sexuality, HIV/AIDS and life skills in education

    Although Botswana's youth constitute 47% of the total population, HIV prevalence among pregnant women aged 15-19 years stands at 22.8% and 38.6% for the 20-24 year olds. The 2004 Botswana AIDS Impact Survey (BAIS II) results continue to show that the virus has a very acute gender dimension, where for every HIV positive boy aged 15-19 years, there are three HIV positive girls. Although education statistics (2001) show a general decline in primary school dropout rate, pregnancy alone contributed to 1.8% of all dropouts nationwide. …

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