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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. In harm's way: the impact of Kenya's restrictive abortion law

    This report is based on research and interviews conducted by the Center between June 2009 and February 2010. The Center gathered the experiences of 59 women through a combination of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. This report proposes specific recommendations to all partners involved in abortion-related issues included the Government of Kenya.

  2. Finding our voices. Gender and sexual identities and HIV/AIDS in education

    Of the 8,600,000 young people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa, 67 percent are young women and 33 percent are young men (Young People and HIV/AIDS: Opportunity in Crisis, UNICEF, UNAIDS, WHO, 2001). The Girls' Education Programme recognises 'gender' as the features associated in specific cultures with masculinity and femininity, and acknowledges that not all societies and cultures share the same ideas of what it means to be male or female. …

  3. The voices and identities of Botswana's school children. Gender, sexuality, HIV/AIDS and life skills in education

    Although Botswana's youth constitute 47% of the total population, HIV prevalence among pregnant women aged 15-19 years stands at 22.8% and 38.6% for the 20-24 year olds. The 2004 Botswana AIDS Impact Survey (BAIS II) results continue to show that the virus has a very acute gender dimension, where for every HIV positive boy aged 15-19 years, there are three HIV positive girls. Although education statistics (2001) show a general decline in primary school dropout rate, pregnancy alone contributed to 1.8% of all dropouts nationwide. …

  4. Gender differentials in adolescent sexual activity and reproductive health risks in Cameroon

    This paper documents how young men and women in Cameroon vary in the way they conduct their sexual lives as well as in the reproductive health risks they take. Consideration is given to gender differentials in patterns of sexual initiation, number of regular and casual partners, and condom use. It also examines factors affecting male and female patterns of sexual and reproductive health behaviour. It evaluates and contrasts the health consequences of the sexual activity of both males and females, including the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections.

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