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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Efficacy of an American alcohol and hiv prevention curriculum adapted for use in South Africa: results of a pilot study in five township schools

    The high prevalence of HIV among young people in African countries underscores a pressing need for effective prevention interventions. Adapting school–based prevention programs developed in the United States for use in African schools may present an alternative to the time–consuming process of developing home–grown programs. The researchers report the results of a pretest–posttest field trial of an alcohol/ HIV prevention curriculum adapted from an American model and delivered to ninth-grade students in five South African township schools. …

  2. Multiculturalism and AIDS: different communities mean different educational messages required

    The multitude of ethnic communities in Canada means different approaches and methods must be used for health education. Canadian AIDS educators have used a range of approaches, including an AIDS bingo game for indigenous populations in northern Manitobaáand AIDS education messages in the streets of Toronto.

  3. Perceptions of secondary technical schools students in Assiut, upper Egypt, about AIDS: Effect of an educational intervention

    This quasi-experimental study explores 575 secondary technical school students' knowledge on AIDS after a short health education program in Assiut City. Students were recruited using two-stage stratified cluster sampling and completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Pre and post testing was used to identify changes in knowledge. Only 30.8% students had satisfactory knowledge on AIDS prior to the health program. Statistically significant increases in knowledge were found after program implementation (P0.001). …

  4. Gender Inequalities in primary Schooling: The roles of poverty and adverse cultural practice

    This paper suggests a simple model for the relationships between poverty, schooling and gender inequality. It argues that poverty at both national and household levels is associated with an under-enrolment of school age children, but that the gendered outcomes of such under enrolment are the product of cultural practice, rather than poverty per se. Using detailed case study material from two African countries, evidence is presented to show the variety and extent of adverse cultural practice which impede the attendance and performance of girls at school, relative to boys. …

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