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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. 'Culturespeak' is everywhere: an analysis of culturalist narratives in approaches to sexuality education in Mozambique

    Building on postcolonial feminist scholars and critical anthropological work, this paper analyses the frequent deployment of the notion of ‘culture’ by decision-makers, educators, international agency staff and young people in the design, delivery and uptake of sexuality and HIV prevention education in Mozambique. The paper presents qualitative data gathered in Maputo, Mozambique to highlight the essentialising nature of culturalist assumptions underpinning in-school sexuality education. …

  2. Caught in culture? Cultural transformation through HIV/AIDS prevention education in Zambia

    The study explores the role and contribution of education in developing a localized and relevant HIV/AIDS prevention strategy through a multi-voiced approach, involving the educational institutions, as well as the traditional leaders, community-members, including parents. The study comprised all public schools in one Zambian province from 2002-2008. The study explores, among other factors, the role of traditional culture in mitigating and exacerbating the spread of the disease. …

  3. An examination of knowledge, attitudes and practices related to HIV/AIDS prevention in Zimbabwean university students: Comparing intervention program participants and non-participants

    OBJECTIVES: This study represents a comprehensive assessment of differences between participants in an HIV/AIDS prevention program (SHAPE: Sustainability, Hope, Action, Prevention, Education) and non-participants in knowledge, attitudes and practices with a focus on cultural, sociological and economic variables. METHODS: We developed an eight-page questionnaire that was administered to 933 randomly selected students at the University of Zimbabwe. Survey items addressed sexual decision-making, condom use, limiting sexual partners, cultural power dynamics and access to HIV testing. …

  4. Talk what others think you can’t talk: HIV/AIDS clubs as peer education in Ugandan schools

    In this article, we make the case that HIV/AIDS clubs in Ugandan schools provide valuable information to students who may not have easy access to health services. As one club motto suggests, the clubs ‘talk what others think you can’t talk’. The innovative peer education methods, which include drama, popular culture and community outreach all have great appeal to youth, and provide unique opportunities for female students to raise gender issues and develop leadership skills. …

  5. Efficacy of an American alcohol and hiv prevention curriculum adapted for use in South Africa: results of a pilot study in five township schools

    The high prevalence of HIV among young people in African countries underscores a pressing need for effective prevention interventions. Adapting school–based prevention programs developed in the United States for use in African schools may present an alternative to the time–consuming process of developing home–grown programs. The researchers report the results of a pretest–posttest field trial of an alcohol/ HIV prevention curriculum adapted from an American model and delivered to ninth-grade students in five South African township schools. …

  6. Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progress Survey: Vietnam Summary Report

    Viet Nam Country Report for the 2011-2012 Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progress Survey.

  7. Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progres Survey: Nigeria Summary Report

    Nigeria Country Report for the 2011-2012 Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progress Survey.

  8. Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progress Survey: Myanmar Summary Report

    Myanmar Country Report for the 2011-2012 Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progress Survey.

  9. Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progress Survey: Mauritius Summary Report

    Mauritius Country Report for the 2011-2012 Education Sector HIV and AIDS Global Progress Survey.

  10. Experiences in socio-cultural approaches to HIV prevention education and empowerment in the Caribbean

    This booklet gives a snap shot of the different socio-cultural approaches to HIV/AIDS prevention in the Caribbean. It presents edu-drama, theatre in education and other alternative media interventions that are geared towards empowering youth, their parents and community leaders to live a healthy lifestyle and create a safe environment within their communities.

  11. Multiculturalism and AIDS: different communities mean different educational messages required

    The multitude of ethnic communities in Canada means different approaches and methods must be used for health education. Canadian AIDS educators have used a range of approaches, including an AIDS bingo game for indigenous populations in northern Manitobaáand AIDS education messages in the streets of Toronto.

  12. Culturally-adapted and audio-technology assisted HIV/AIDS awareness and education program in rural Nigeria: a cohort study

    This prospective, 14-week cohort study sought to identify changes in HIV knowledge using a culturally-adapted, technology assisted educational approach in three rural Nigerian villages. One group of people were given seminar-based education, while another were given a portable, digial audio technology-based educational program, which drew on the rural culture of oral learning. The majority of the participants were Muslim (99%), male (53.3%) and lacked formal education (55%). HIV knowledge was improved by a larger degree in the technology facilitated group than the seminar-based group. …

  13. Perceptions of secondary technical schools students in Assiut, upper Egypt, about AIDS: Effect of an educational intervention

    This quasi-experimental study explores 575 secondary technical school students' knowledge on AIDS after a short health education program in Assiut City. Students were recruited using two-stage stratified cluster sampling and completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Pre and post testing was used to identify changes in knowledge. Only 30.8% students had satisfactory knowledge on AIDS prior to the health program. Statistically significant increases in knowledge were found after program implementation (P0.001). …

  14. Indigenous knowledge of HIV/AIDS among High School students in Namibia

    The study explored the indigenous names for HIV/AIDS and its symptoms. Qualitative data was gathered through focus groups with students from 18 secondary schools across six educational districts. People living with HIV/AIDS were called names meaning prostitute: ihule, butuku bwa sihule, and shikumbu. Names such askibutu bwa masapo (bone disease),katjumba (a young child), kakithi (disease), and shinangele (very thin person) described AIDS. Derogatory names like mbwa (dog), esingahogo (pretender), ekifi (disease), and shinyakwi noyana (useless person) were also used. …

  15. Young people's understanding of HIV: a qualitative study among school students in Mankweng, South Africa

    This article describes young people's interpretation of HIV, AIDS and sexually transmitted illness in a rural South African community in Mankweng, Limpopo Province. Method: The study was based on 19 focus group discussions with adolescents aged 12-14 years. Results: Our participants had limited knowledge about HIV from a biomedical perspective. Their understanding and interpretations of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases were largely informed by traditional and religious belief systems that explain how and why people contract an illness via sexual intercourse. …

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