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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Food for thought? Experimental evidence on the learning impacts of a large-scale school feeding program

    There is limited experimental evidence of the impact of large-scale, government-led school meals programs on educational achievements. The authors report results from a nationwide randomized trial of the Government of Ghana’s school feeding program. After two years, program availability led to moderate increases in test scores for the average pupil, and to remarkable learning and cognitive gains for girls, and children from the poorest households and regions. Increases in enrolment, attainment, and shifts in time spent at school constituted mechanisms for impact. …

  2. Food for thought? Experimental evidence on the learning impacts of a large-scale school feeding program in Ghana

    There is very limited experimental evidence of the impact of large-scale, government-led school meals programs on child educational achievements in Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors address this gap by reporting treatment effects from a nationwide randomized trial of the Government of Ghana’s school feeding program (GSFP) on children’s math and literacy, cognition (problem-solving ability and working memory), and composite scores of overall attainments. …

  3. Improving lives by accelerating progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals for adolescents living with HIV: a prospective cohort study

    Background: Low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) face major challenges in achieving the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for vulnerable adolescents. We aimed to test the UN Development Programme's proposed approach of development accelerators—provisions that lead to progress across multiple SDGs—and synergies between accelerators on achieving SDG-aligned targets in a highly vulnerable group of adolescents in South Africa. …

  4. Global partnership for action to eliminate all forms of HIV-related stigma and discrimination

    Without addressing HIV-related stigma and discrimination, the world will not achieve the goal of ending AIDS as a public health threat by 2030. The global partnership’s goal is to reach zero HIV-related stigma and discrimination. An opportunity to harness the combined power of governments, civil society and the United Nations, the global partnership will work together, using the unique skills of each constituency, to consign HIV-related stigma and discrimination to history.

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis: educational interventions that reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS infection in Kenyan teenagers

    This paper demonstrates a comprehensive and thorough application of an education cost-effectiveness analysis. Two interventions implemented in Western Kenya aimed to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS contraction in middle school girls. The cost-effectiveness of each intervention is assessed, ex post facto, by combining the results of the two programs’ evaluations with their costs. As few education evaluations consider cost, this article highlights a sound and disciplined method to use when detailed cost information is both readily available and unavailable. …

  6. Increasing investments in the sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing of adolescents and young people in Ghana

    Young people in every society constitute both the current and potential human capital of a nation’s development. In order to ensure that young people have a fulfilling sexual and reproductive life, appropriate investments must be made in their health and socio-economic well-being.

  7. Multi-stakeholder cooperation on sexual and reproductive health for young people: handbook of experiences and tools from a project in the Ohangwena Region in Namibia as an example for the implementation of the ESA commitment at a local level

    This handbook gives a detailed insight into the initiative in Ohangwena, which provides an example which can be expanded and improved upon in Namibia, and in the other 22 ESA countries.

  8. HIV prevention in Southern Africa for young people with a focus on young women and girls in Botswana

    This review focuses on the major factors that drive HIV infection and explores interventions that have demonstrated effectiveness, as well as illustrating important learnings for programme development. Findings inform understanding of sex and sexuality in relation to HIV risk and the potentials for interventions in the Botswana context.

  9. HIV and human rights: A mapping of donor priorities and trends in southern Africa

    Donors at every level are retreating on funding commitments to HIV, and organizations working at the intersection of AIDS and rights are facing overall funding challenges. This briefing paper reports the findings of a 2012 study on HIV and human rights donor trends in Southern Africa, commissioned by the Open Society Foundations. It identifies opportunities to leverage donor support for HIV and human rights organizations, and for donor collaboration that can support them in the current funding environment.

  10. In a life: linking HIV and sexual and reproductive health in people’s lives

    IPPF’s comprehensive response to HIV is situated within a wider sexual and reproductive health framework. It links prevention with treatment, care and support; reduces HIV-related stigma and discrimination; and responds to the unique regional and national characteristics of the HIV epidemic. These real-life testimonies highlight how our work – shaped and pioneered by the efforts of thousands of committed staff, volunteers and partners – makes the vital links between HIV, sexual and reproductive health and rights.

  11. Incorporating a structural approach within combination HIV prevention: an organising framework

    The Problem: “Structural factors” are characteristics of the social, economic, legal, and cultural environment that act as determinants of HIV risk for whole populations and of how this risk is distributed within populations. To date, “structural approaches” that engage these factors remain poorly developed. The Target Audience Perspective: “HIV prevention programmers” control the deployment of limited resources over set timeframes with the primary goal of reducing HIV infection rates and disparities. …

  12. AIDSTAR-One/USAID skills building workshop in West Africa: Key findings for guiding programming for most-at-risk populations in mixed epidemic settings

    AIDSTAR-One, in collaboration with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) West Africa Regional Health Office in Accra, Ghana, and supported by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, facilitated a workshop held May 2–3, 2012, in support of regional HIV prevention activities. …

  13. An assessment of cost, quality and outcomes for five HIV prevention youth peer education programs in Zambia

    Research on the effectiveness of youth peer education programs (YPE) programs is scarce, and the wide variation in programs makes it difficult to generalize research findings. Measuring quality and comparing program effectiveness require the use of standardized instruments. In this study, the authors used standardized evidence-based instruments to compare program inputs, quality, outputs and outcomes for five YPE programs in Zambia. …

  14. Developmentally Based Interventions and Strategies: Promoting Reproductive Health and Reducing Risk among Adolescents

    This tool has been prepared by FOCUS on Young Adults primarily for those who design and deliver programs and who formulate policies concerned with the well-being of young people in the developing world. It specifically explores (a) adolescence as a distinct stage in the developmental process,(b) the defining characteristics of adolescence, (c) the variety of factors that influence it, and (d) its societal and cultural relevance. …

  15. Manual on Best Practices HIV/AIDS Programming with Children and Young People (version 8.4.2005)

    What are Best Practices? What criteria can be used to define a Best Practice and how can Best Practices be used? How can we promote the use of Best Practices by program staff in the field? These are some of the questions that this manual seeks to answer in relation to HIV/AIDS interventions and programs with children and youth. In order to strengthen the member organisations' use of the Best Practice approach both as a tool and as a process, the two networks entered into a joint venture in 2003. …

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