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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The hidden crisis: armed conflict and education; EFA global monitoring report, 2011

    Violent conflict is one of the greatest development challenges facing the international community. Beyond the immediate human suffering it causes, it is a source of poverty, inequality and economic stagnation. Children and education systems are often on the front line of violent conflict. The 2011 Global Monitoring Report examines the damaging consequences of conflict for the Education for All goals. …

  2. The education sectors' responses to the needs and vulnerabilities of children affected by HIV/AIDS

    Education is a crucial factor in the development of a child. In the light of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, education has become even more vital. The paradox, nevertheless, is that the pandemic has constrained school attendance, as well as school performance. The purpose of this study was to establish to what extent primary school-aged children affected by HIV/AIDS (CABA) are educationally affected, as well as to find out how the education sector is responding to the problems CABA face. …

  3. HIV/AIDS and education in Jamaica: Is the HIV epidemic affecting the supply of educators and the demand for education in Jamaica? Barriers to integration of HIV/AIDS infected/affected children into the Jamaican school system.

    Research undertaken with UNESCO support by Professor Wilma Bailey and Dr. Affette McCaw-Binns of the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, on issues related to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Jamaica and the education system was completed at the end of 2004.Themes investigated were: Barriers to the integration of HIV/AIDS infected/affected children into the Jamaican school system; The HIV epidemic: is it affecting the supply of educators and the demand for education in Jamaica? For discussion of methodology and findings, contact Professor Bailey at wilma.bailey@uwimona.edu.jm

  4. HIV as part of the life of children and youth, as life expectancy increases: implications for education

    The education sector is crucial to any national response to the world epidemic of HIV and AIDS. The school age years, about 5 to15 years, make up the cross section of any population with the lowest prevalence of HIV infection. This is the "Window of Hope". Education is the social vaccine against HIV infection. But, with effective anti-viral treatment the number of infected children of school age rises, through increased survival. Schools must adapt to having many such children in class. …

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