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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Kenya fast-track plan to end HIV and AIDS along adolescents and young people

    Goal: To fast-track the HIV response to end new HIV infections, AIDS related deaths and stigma and discrimination in adolescents and young people. Objectives of this fast-track plan: 1. To reduce new HIV infections among adolescents and young people by 40%; 2. To reduce AIDS related deaths among adolescent and young people by 15%; 3. To reduce stigma and discrimination by 25%. Target beneficiaries: The target beneficiary populations are adolescent boys and girls aged 10 – 19 years and young people, particularly women, aged 20 – 24 years. …

  2. The Global Fund in the MENA region: an Aidspan regional report 2015

    This is the first regional report published by Aidspan. These regional reports seek to provide a snapshot to country partners, advocates and other stakeholders of comparative information, to make it easier for them to assess their countries’ progress and performance and understand the regional picture of Global Fund programmes.

  3. Acceptance and coping: National HIV strategy (2009-2014)

    The comprehensive aim of this strategy is that at the end of the strategy period, Norway will be a society that accepts and copes with HIV in a way that both limits new infection and gives persons living with HIV good conditions for social inclusion in all phases of their lives. Specific objectives: 1) Increase the knowledge about and awareness of HIV and AIDS in the population. 2) Reduce stigmatisation and discrimination associated with HIV. …

  4. UNAIDS Middle East and North Africa regional report on AIDS 2011

    In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, the HIV epidemic has been on the rise since 2001. Although the overall HIV prevalence in the region is still low, the rise in new infections has put MENA among the top two regions in the world with the fastest growing HIV epidemic. The rise in the estimated number of people living with HIV in the region presumably is the result of an increased HIV prevalence among key populations at higher risk and a forward transmission of the virus to a larger number of individuals who are generally at lower risk of infection.

  5. We can empower young people to protect themselves from HIV. Joint Action for Results, UNAIDS Outcome Framework: Business Case 2009-2011

    The Joint Action for Results: UNAIDS Outcome Framework, 2009-2011 represents a new and more focused commitment to the HIV response and serves as a platform to move towards UNAIDS' vision of zero new HIV-infections, zero discrimination, and zero AIDS-related deaths. It commits the UNAIDS Secretariat and Cosponsors to leverage their respective organizational mandates and resources to work collectively to deliver results.The Outcome Framework focuses on ten priority areas, each of which represents a pivotal component of the AIDS response. …

  6. HIV in the Middle East

    HIV in the Middle East is a short article written by C. Makhlouf Obermeyer from the Department of HIV/AIDS of the WHO in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2006. It summarizes what is known about the HIV epidemic in the Middle East and north Africa region and examines the extent to which lower prevalence can be attributed to cultural factors, particularly those related to the practice of Islam and gender. …

  7. The AIDS 2008 impact report: evidence to action

    The purpose of the 'AIDS 2008 Impact Report: Evidence to Action' is to inform the global response to HIV using the evidence, lessons learned, and debates from the XVII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2008), held in Mexico City from 3-8 August 2008. The 'AIDS 2008 Impact Report' is intended to be used by all stakeholders to support implementation of evidence-based policy and programming that will bring us closer to the goal of universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. It is divided into five major sections: 1. …

  8. Facing the HIV/AIDS pandemic

    We are entering the third decade of what may be the most devastating epidemic in human history: HIV/AIDS. The disease continues to ravage families, communities, and countries throughout the world. In addition to the 20 million people who have already died of AIDS, most of the 40 million people now living with HIV are likely to die a decade or more prematurely. Each day, 14,000 people-12,000 adults and 2,000 children-become infected with HIV. At least 95 percent of these new infections occur in less developed countries; more than 50 percent afflict women and young adults. …

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