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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Global partnership for action to eliminate all forms of HIV-related stigma and discrimination

    Without addressing HIV-related stigma and discrimination, the world will not achieve the goal of ending AIDS as a public health threat by 2030. The global partnership’s goal is to reach zero HIV-related stigma and discrimination. An opportunity to harness the combined power of governments, civil society and the United Nations, the global partnership will work together, using the unique skills of each constituency, to consign HIV-related stigma and discrimination to history.

  2. Our rights matter too: sexual and reproductive health and rights of young key populations in Asia and the Pacific

    This regional report for Asia and the Pacific, provides an overview of the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) needs, issues, and priorities of young key populations (YKP), i.e. young men who have sex with men, young transgender people, young people injecting drugs, young people who sell sex, and young people living with HIV. The report addresses the gaps in knowledge on the SRHR needs of YKP in the region, offers recommendations based on a regional study, and contributes essential information for policy and advocacy efforts.

  3. If you care about LGBTQ rights... Then you should care about sex education

    The first fact sheet of the If/Then series highlights that advancing sex education also means advancing the equality and well-being of the LGBTQ community at large.

  4. From shadows to light: advocacy for children of HIV-affected key populations

    For many years now, the children of HIV-affected key populations—sex workers, transgender people, people who use drugs and gay men and other men who have sex with men—have remained in the shadows. …

  5. A call to action: LGBTQ youth need inclusive sex education

    This issue brief urges educators, advocates, and policymakers to take immediate, concrete steps to provide LGBTQ-inclusive sex education for all youth, by: 1) Becoming advocates for LGBTQ-inclusive sex education, 2) Ensuring that school is a safe and accepting space for LGBTQ students, 3) Implementing LGBTQ-inclusive sex education in schools, community settings and online, 4) Talking to their own children and teens about sex and sexuality, 5) Working to remove state-level legal and policy barriers to LGBTQ-inclusive sex education in schools and require inclusive programs.

  6. Brighter life for all: advocacy strategy to increase access to quality health services for adolescents and young people living with HIV in Uganda 2015 - 2017

    This Advocacy Strategy focuses on reducing barriers facing Adolescents and Youth Living with HIV for improved quality of life. It emphasizes three interlinked objectives to 1) promote positive and dignified lives for AYLHIV free from stigma and discrimination; 2) enhance access to psychosocial support services; 3) increase access and utilization of friendly comprehensive package of services; and 4) improve Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention (PHDP). This holistic approach will ensure an equitable HIV response that ensures no adolescent/youth is left behind.

  7. Empower young women and adolescent girls: fast-track the end of the AIDS epidemic in Africa

    The purpose of this report is to guide regional and global advocacy and inform political dialogue over the coming year, including in the contexts of the African Union Agenda 2063 and the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. …

  8. The impact of homophobic and transphobic bullying on education and employment: Advocacy recommendations

    In 2013, IGLYO commissioned research that examined the experiences of homophobic and transphobic bullying within the educational context and its impact on employment and future career. An online survey targeted respondents in Croatia, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and Poland. The final results were drawn out of 187 survey responses, as well as a substantial number of complementary research reports.

  9. A Brief on school bullying on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity: LGBT-friendly Thailand?

    The analysis presented here is from a study commissioned by UNESCO Bangkok and Plan International Thailand, and conducted by Mahidol University. There has been research on school bullying in Thailand, but only anecdotal evidence on bullying specifically targetting students who are, or are perceived to be, LGBT, or mechanisms to counter it in Thai schools. This study aimed to fill this gap in evidence, and to identify policy and programme implications. It is the first systematic study on the issue in Thailand.

  10. Life Doesn’t Wait. Romania’s Failure to Protect and Support Children and Youth Living with HIV

    More than 7,200 Romanian children and youth age fifteen to nineteen are living with HIV—the largest such group in any European country. The vast majority were infected with HIV between 1986 and 1991 as a direct result of government policies that exposed them to contaminated needles and “microtransfusions” of unscreened blood. Despite Romania’s progressive expansion of access to antiretroviral drugs, these children and youth face pervasive stigma and discrimination that often impedes their enjoyment of basic rights and services. …

  11. Reproductive rights: a tool for monitoring state obligations

    This Monitoring Tool provides a means for human rights experts responsible for overseeing compliance with international legal standards on human rights to monitor the implementation of specific State obligations in the field of reproductive rights. The tool outlines State obligations under international and regional human rights law on a range of reproductive rights issues–freedom from discrimination, contraceptive information and services, safe pregnancy and childbirth, abortion and post-abortion care, comprehensive sexuality education, freedom from violence against women, and HIV/AIDS. …

  12. Women out loud: How women living with HIV will help the world end AIDS

    Women may make up half the world’s population, but they do not share it equally. This is especially evident when it comes to HIV. Half of all people living with HIV are women, yet many are underserved or do not know their status. Despite the many successes we have seen, women still face inequalities that will keep the AIDS response from reaching its full potential.

  13. Positive learning: meeting the needs of young people living with HIV (YPLHIV) in the education sector

    This publication is the result of a partnership between UNESCO and the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+). It builds upon the respective work of these organisations in relation to supporting the ideals of Education for All and the role of the education sector in the global response to HIV (UNESCO) and the Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention framework (GNP+). The overall purpose is to better define the role and responsibilities of the education sector in supporting young people who are living with HIV (YPLHIV) to realise their personal, social and educational potential. …

  14. Girls' education, empowerment, and transitions to adulthood: The case for a shared agenda

    Education is essential to prepare adolescent girls for healthy, safe and productive transitions to adulthood. However, adolescent girls in much of the developing world are underserved by the education sector – too many are not in school, or are not receiving a quality, relevant education in a safe and supportive environment. At the same time, programs that emphasize girls’ healthy and productive transitions to adulthood are not adequately linking with the education sector. …

  15. Tackling violence in school: A global perspective. Bridging the gap between standards and practice

    On any given day, more than one billion children around the world attend school. Many of these children enjoy their right to be taught in a safe and stimulating environment. For many others, however, schooling does not guarantee such opportunity. These girls and boys are exposed to bullying, sexual and gender-based violence, corporal punishment and other forms of violence with or without the approval of education authorities. Many are also exposed to schoolyard fighting, gang violence, assault with weapons, and sexual and gender-based violence by their own peers. …

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