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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Overlooked and at Risk: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in the Caribbean

    As long as criminalization of homosexuality and stigma, discrimination and violence against LGBT individuals continues in the Caribbean, the emotional and physical health of LGBT young people is at risk. All young people have the right to be treated equally under the law and to live free of discrimination and harassment. Organizations, governments, and individuals must work toward full acceptance and recognition of LGBT people, including young people.

  2. Health and Family Life Education. Teacher Training Manual

    This manual supports the implementation of the Health and Family Life Education (HFLE) curriculum to be implemented in schools across the island. In order to be able to teach a new curriculum using the non-traditional teaching methodology and strategies of the Life Skills approach, those involved in delivering this new curriculum need to participate in effective training and development activities that result in building their sensitivities, knowledge, skills and capabilities to create a learning environment that facilitates students' learning in an enjoyable manner. …

  3. HIV and AIDS in Jamaica national strategic plan 2007-2012

    This national strategic plan presents the HIV/AIDS situation in Jamaica. The situational analysis refers to surveillance data and notes that the HIV epidemic in Jamaica is driven by behavioural, economic and sociocultural factors. …

  4. 2008 HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behavior survey, Jamaica. Report of findings from HIV/AIDS knowledge attitudes and behavior survey, Jamaica 2008

    The Caribbean is second only to sub-Saharan Africa in HIV & AIDS prevalence. Jamaica, the largest island in the English speaking Caribbean island has however been relentless in its efforts to stem the spread of the disease and in 2007 estimated that approximately 1.3% of the adult Jamaican population was infected with two-thirds being unaware of their status. Behavioural surveillance is part of the Ministry of Health's ongoing efforts. …

  5. Addressing HIV and AIDS stigma in Jamaica: Lessons learned from a community based sensitization programme

    Many challenges have been encountered in the response to HIV and AIDS, not the least of which is the impact of stigma on the lives of people infected as well as those otherwise affected. We recognize that a multi-pronged approach is necessary in any effort to combat this disease and propose that explicit sensitization training and anti-stigma measures are a critical component of any successful HIV&AIDS education or elimination program. Working with people living with HIV & AIDS (PLWHA) has been a precious, most invaluable experience. …

  6. The response of the education sector in Jamaica to HIV and AIDS

    This study aims to assess the effectiveness of Jamaica's current and planned response to HIV and AIDS in the education sector, highlighting strengths and critical gaps. It outlines parameters for a strategic planning exercise that will develop an action plan for the period 2006-2010 for the education sector which in turn will contribute to the preparation of the National AIDS strategy for the same 5 year period. The report is based on data obtained through a review of documents, stakeholder interviews and field visits in Kingston, Browns Town and Ocho Rios. …

  7. National Policy for HIV/AIDS Management in Schools

    Internationally, the first case of AIDS was diagnosed more than twenty years ago. In spite of extensive research, the origin of HIV has not been discovered. The spread of HIV in Jamaica is mainly through sexual contact between men and women. Additionally, about one-third of all babies born to HIV infected women are infected during pregnancy, at birth or through breast feeding unless anti-retroviral medication is given to prevent HIV transmission from mother to child.Persons infected with HIV do not immediately develop AIDS or AIDS symptoms. …

  8. HIV/AIDS and education in Jamaica: Is the HIV epidemic affecting the supply of educators and the demand for education in Jamaica? Barriers to integration of HIV/AIDS infected/affected children into the Jamaican school system.

    Research undertaken with UNESCO support by Professor Wilma Bailey and Dr. Affette McCaw-Binns of the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, on issues related to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Jamaica and the education system was completed at the end of 2004.Themes investigated were: Barriers to the integration of HIV/AIDS infected/affected children into the Jamaican school system; The HIV epidemic: is it affecting the supply of educators and the demand for education in Jamaica? For discussion of methodology and findings, contact Professor Bailey at wilma.bailey@uwimona.edu.jm

  9. Expanding the field of inquiry: A cross-country study of higher education institutions' responses to HIV and AIDS

    This report compares, analyses, and summarises findings from twelve case studies commissioned by the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in higher education institutions in Brazil, Burkina Faso, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Lebanon, Lesotho, Suriname, Thailand, and Viet Nam. …

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