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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. School health and nutrition

    This thematic study on School Health and Nutrition reviews what has happened in the field of school health and nutrition since the World Conference on Education for All (Jomtien, Thailand, 1990), identifies strategies and interventions that have proven effective, and suggests actions for the decade to come. This study also explores conceptual frameworks in school health and nutrition that developed during the 1990s and reviews regional trends, activities and barriers for school health. …

  2. Improved access to education for orphans or vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS

    Children and youth affected by HIV/AIDS face many stressors and competing priorities regarding family, health, education, protection and economic stability. The policy environment created by the Dakar Framework for Action–Education for All created an entry point for governments to respond to the educational needs of orphans and vulnerable children based on locally driven context. The international community has made financial and programming resources available to support education for orphans and vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS at the country level. …

  3. Education, literacy and health outcomes findings

    This paper was commissioned by the Education for All Global Monitoring Report as background information to assist in drafting the 2013/4 report. It looks at the relationship between education and literacy on child health. Improvements in women’s education are associated with significant reductions in under five mortality.

  4. Can we use young people’s knowledge to develop teachers and HIV-related education?

    Despite recent progress in meeting the goals of the Education for All agenda, certain groups of young people are particularly vulnerable to exclusion and underachievement, including children with HIV/AIDS, children living in poverty, and children with disabilities. HIV/AIDS has reduced many young people’s rights to access education, to live a full and healthy life, and to have a life as a child. …

  5. Economic impact of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on education supply in high prevalence regions

    Background: We set out to estimate, for the three geographical regions with the highest HIV prevalence, (sub-Saharan Africa [SSA], the Caribbean and the Greater Mekong sub-region of East Asia), the human resource and economic impact of HIV on the supply of education from 2008 to 2015, the target date for the achievement of Education For All (EFA), contrasting the continuation of access to care, support and Antiretroviral therapy (ART) to the scenario of universal access. …

  6. School health, nutrition and education for all: levelling the playing field

    Providing good quality education to all children in the poorest countries of the world is not a simple task. However, improving children’s health and nutrition is one simple step that can be taken towards achieving this goal. Health and nutrition programmes offer substantial benefits to children’s education, helping them to attend school and learn while there. …

  7. Different families: the experiences of children with lesbian and gay parents

    This research provides pioneering understanding of the current experience of the children of lesbian and gay parents. Many come from families which look remarkably like everyone else's. However, their lived experience is often similar to that of so many black or Asian or Jewish children. It's the prejudices of others that cause them far more distress than their own personal or family characteristics. Having interviewed children as young as four, this study also provides groundbreaking insights into the existence of homophobia in Britain's schools, including primary schools. …

  8. Estimates of the Impact of HIV and teacher ART take-up on the Education Sector on the achievement of EFA in Rwanda

    This impact analysis revealed that the number of HIV positive teachers is likely to increase, as could AIDS mortality and absenteeism. ART, particularly second-line ART could reduce these problems and save money. HIV prevalence in Rwandan teachers could reach 12% by 2015. Considerable effort is required to reduce pupil-teacher ratios and increase orphan school attendance. Rwanda can celebrate its successes in increasing net enrolment.

  9. Estimates of the Impact of HIV and teacher ART take-up on the Education Sector and the achievement of EFA in Kenya

    An analysis was carried out to indirectly estimate the imapct of HIV on the education sector in Kenyan provinces using the Ed-SIDA model which uses teacher demographic information and combines this with epidemiological projections to determine the number of teachers who are living with HIV, their AIDS absenteeism and associated mortality. The main results were that HIV prevalence among Kenyan teachers can be expected to be high, 15%, due to teachers belonging to vulnerable age groups. …

  10. Strengthening the education sector response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/World Bank missions to Guyana, Jamaica, and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendixes sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV and AIDS by the education sector.

  11. Managing Teachers. The centrality of teacher management to quality education. Lessons from developing countries.

    The report reveals that developing countries often have constrained budgets due to limited resources and in some cases tight fiscal management policies imposed by the International Monetary Fund. It urges governments and donors funding education in developing countries to prioritise teacher management. Ignoring this issue will lead to, poor living and working conditions for teachers and school leaders and ultimately children will be denied their right to a quality education. …

  12. Access of girls and women to scientific, technical and vocational education in Africa

    UNESCO's General Conference at its 28th session (Paris 1995), budgeted a project on 'Technical, scientific and vocational training for young girls in Africa'. Pursuant to this decision, the Regional Office for Education in Africa in Dakar (BREDA), in cooperation with headquarters started with a preparatory phase to implement the project aimed at identifying what determines girls being guided into scientific and technical streams. During 1996-1997, surveys were conducted in twenty English and French countries in Africa. …

  13. Supporting the educational needs of HIV-positive learners: lessons from Namibia and Tanzania

    This report is a commissioned review of best practice as well as an exploratory study in two countries, Namibia and Tanzania, to understand how the education sector should support HIV-positive learners at school. The increase in the number of children and young people living with HIV poses new challenges to the education sector. The report identifies the specific challenges faced by the education system in responding to the needs of HIV-positive learners and develops a set of recommendations and guidelines about how best to support them.

  14. Overcoming the obstacles to EFA

    Over the past years, great efforts have been made to increase the number of children that have access to education in Africa. A good number of countries have succeeded in increasing significantly the number of children enrolled in very few years. They have done so by abolishing school fees and also encouraging the development of community schools, and/or by recruiting teachers at lower costs. More funds have been mobilized for education and national and international development. …

  15. Mitigating the Impact of HIV/AIDS on Education Systems in Southern Africa

    The gains of Education for All, 1990 2000 (EFA) are being undone by the AIDS pandemic, particularly in Southern Africa. Nevertheless, most countries in the region, as elsewhere, do not yet factor the influence of AIDS into education planning. While attention has been given by many ministries to teaching children about safe sex through the Life Skills curriculum, little has as yet been done to assess the actual and potential damage of AIDS to learning, to the teaching service, and to the education system itself. …

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