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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Menarche and its implications for educational policy in Peru

    Indigenous girls in rural areas live in the most extreme poverty and make up the least educated groups in Peru. These girls face numerous constraints to obtaining an education. Enrollment rates are lower for girls in rural areas, and their grade repetition rates are higher than those for boys. Adolescence is particularly difficult, as girls face a number of risks during this time. Once they begin menstruation, completing their primary school education is a formidable challenge, and opportunities for advancing to secondary school are limited. …

  2. Kenya: helping adolescent mothers remain in school through strengthened implementation of school re-entry policies

    The goal of this case study is to document an activity of the STEP UP research programme consortium which resulted in successful evidence utilization. This is to both demonstrate the positive impact STEP UP is having on family planning and reproductive health policies, as well as to document the process by which this was achieved so as to inform future research of successful strategies and lessons learned. …

  3. School feeding and girls’ enrollment: the effects of alternative implementation modalities in low-income settings in sub-Saharan Africa

    BACKGROUND: School feeding interventions are implemented in nearly every country in the world, with the potential to support the education, health and nutrition of school children. In terms of impact on school participation, there is little evidence to show that different school feeding modalities have different effect sizes. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of different school feeding modalities on primary school enrollment, particularly for girls, in 32 countries across sub-Saharan Africa. …

  4. A survey on re-entry of pregnant girls in primary and secondary schools in Uganda: survey briefing

    The main objective of the Survey on Re-Entry of Pregnant Girls in Primary and Secondary Schools in Uganda (2011) is to collect evidence and articulate policy options to address the re-integration of pregnant girls and child mothers in school in Uganda. …

  5. Supporting the academic success of pregnant and parenting students under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972

    This pamphlet has been prepared for secondary school administrators, teachers, counselors, parents, and students. The first section provides background on school retention problems associated with pregnant and parenting students. The next two sections, “Title IX Requirements Regarding Pregnant and Parenting Students” and “Frequently Asked Questions Pertaining to Title IX Requirements Regarding Pregnant and Parenting Students,” provide information on the law’s specific requirements regarding pregnancy and parenthood. …

  6. Measures for the prevention and management of learner pregnancy. Choose to wait for a brighter future

    This document aims to clarify the position of the department of Education regarding learner pregnancies. The measures provide a framework for: educating and assisting learners to understand and exercise their rights and responsibilities in regard to healthy lifestyles; guiding and supporting vulnerable learners; and involving all relevant role-players, and integrating these measures with available systems and structures.

  7. An assessment of the implementation of the re-entry policy for girls in Swaziland: school practices and implications for policy development

    Swaziland has no stand-alone re-entry policy. Practices vary from school to school, but generally a pregnant adolescent girl has to drop out of school although those who become pregnant may be allowed to return to write their exams at the same school or they may be advised to find another examination centre. …

  8. Gender nonconforming youth: Discipline disparities, school push-out, and the school-to-prison pipeline

    The school-to-prison pipeline, or STPP, refers to a set of school policies and practices that push students away from education and onto a pathway toward the juvenile detention and the prison industrial complex. School policies and practices that promote the STPP include “zero tolerance” policies, increased police presence, suspension and expulsion, and harsh and disparate disciplinary practices. Research has demonstrated that students pushed out by such policies, practices, and disciplinary disparities are disproportionally students of color and low-income students. …

  9. Education sector policy for orphans and vulnerable children

    The goal of this policy is to ensure that an increased number of OVC are able to access, remain in, and complete general education of good quality. The objective of this policy is to ensure that all OVC of school-going age attend school and are not deterred from full participation through lack of financial means, material or psychosocial need, stigma, discrimination or any other constraints, and to ensure that out-of school OVC are brought back into school or provided with appropriate alternative educational opportunities.

  10. A Survey on re-entry of pregnant girls in primary and secondary schools in Uganda

    This report contains results of the survey conducted to establish views of the various stakeholders on the question of re-entry of pregnant girls in schools. It outlines the existing status as seen by the various participants in the study - teachers, students and pupils, parents, CSO actors, community leaders and local government officials, MOES officials and MPs. …

  11. School policy on learner pregnancy in Namibia: Background to reform

    This paper seeks to contribute to the discussion and acceptance of a new policy on learner pregnancy, by providing relevant background and comparative information.

  12. Factors shaping the HIV-competence of two primary schools in rural Zimbabwe

    We present multi-method case studies of two Zimbabwean primary schools – one rural and one small-town. The rural school scored higher than the small-town school on measures of child well-being and school attendance by HIV-affected children. The small-town school had superior facilities, more teachers with higher morale, more specialist HIV/AIDS activities, and an explicit religious ethos. The relatively impoverished rural school was located in a more cohesive community with a more critically conscious, dynamic and networking headmaster. …

  13. Education sector policy for the prevention and management of learner pregnancy

    The goal of this policy is to improve the prevention and management of learner pregnancy in Namibia, with the ultimate aim of decreasing the number of learner pregnancies and increasing the number of learner-parents who complete their education. Education is both a human right in itself and an indispensable means of realising other human rights. In order to meet Vision 2030, it is essential that a policy is put in place to address learner pregnancy that will make a real and sustainable difference in the lives of children and their children. …

  14. HIV and AIDS. Its impact on education and an analysis of the implementation of the Kenyan education sector policy on HIV and AIDS

    The aim of this study, undertaken at the request of the Kenyan Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), was to describe and analyse the impact of HIV and AIDS on the education sector in Kenya, and provide a situational analysis of the implementation of the Kenyan Education Sector Policy on HIV and AIDS (2004). It aimed to provide empirical evidence on how HIV and AIDS have affected the education sector in Kenya, and to identify gaps in research and programme interventions. …

  15. A Review of education policy to address the active and passive exclusion of learners affected by HIV and AIDS from attending or participating in schooling

    The study focuses on four key barriers to education, which are most prominent for children affected by HIV and AIDS, namely: HIV/AIDS-related illness of learners; Grief and trauma associated with illness and death of family/household members; Increased domestic responsibility (and exploitation through child labour) for children affected by AIDS; HIV- and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination.

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