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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Keeping African girls in school with better sanitary care

    For young girls in developing countries, not knowing how to manage their periods can hinder access to education. Research from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London demonstrates that in rural Uganda, providing free sanitary products and lessons about puberty to girls may increase their attendance at school.

  2. Menstrual hygiene management compliance in primary schools in Uganda: a case of Lira Municipality

    The main objective of the study was to determine the influence of Menstrual Hygiene Management on school absenteeism of adolescent girls in 10 primary schools in Lira municipality. Our findings highlighted that; majority of the respondent’s onset of the menstruation was at 13 years of age, 60% of the participants used disposable pads. Most respondents changed their pads at least twice a day. Two fifth of the primary girls reported missing school for about 3 days during menstrual periods pointing to the lack of menstrual hygiene products. …

  3. Menstruation and the cycle of poverty: a cluster quasi-randomised control trial of sanitary pad and puberty education provision in Uganda

    Background: Poor menstrual knowledge and access to sanitary products have been proposed as barriers to menstrual health and school attendance. In response, interventions targeting these needs have seen increasing implementation in public and private sectors. However, there has been limited assessment of their effectiveness. …

  4. A survey on re-entry of pregnant girls in primary and secondary schools in Uganda: survey briefing

    The main objective of the Survey on Re-Entry of Pregnant Girls in Primary and Secondary Schools in Uganda (2011) is to collect evidence and articulate policy options to address the re-integration of pregnant girls and child mothers in school in Uganda. …

  5. A Survey on re-entry of pregnant girls in primary and secondary schools in Uganda

    This report contains results of the survey conducted to establish views of the various stakeholders on the question of re-entry of pregnant girls in schools. It outlines the existing status as seen by the various participants in the study - teachers, students and pupils, parents, CSO actors, community leaders and local government officials, MOES officials and MPs. …

  6. I want to study with all my heart: Unpacking reasons for girls' school drop-out in West Nile, Uganda

    From 2013 to 2014 ICRW and the Forum for African Women Educationalists Uganda (FAWEU) partnered to answer several questions about girls’ education in two districts in the West Nile sub-region of Northwestern Uganda: What percentage of adolescent girls (14-18) have dropped out of school? How much of girls’ drop-out could be explained by pregnancy? To what extent are gendered social norms and the effects of conflict influencing pregnancy and drop-out? …

  7. Study on menstrual management in Uganda

    This pilot research study on the impact of menstrual hygiene on girls in school is primarily aimed at the Ministry of Education and Sports and the National Sanitation Working Group. Within the context of Uganda, the results of this study will be used to provide evidence-based advocacy on the role of upper primary girls, from the ages of 13-18, whom have started menstruating, with a specific emphasis placed on the issues and challenges that they face at school. …

  8. Reasons for non-attendance of orphans, children from disjointed families who live with both parents: Evidence from questionnaires and children's drawings

    The paper uses a combination of questionnaire data and children's drawings to explore the reasons contributing to temporary and permanent absence from school of orphans, children from disjointed families and children who live with both parents. Particular attention is paid to differences between these three groups of children and between girls and boys. It is shown that the most important reasons for absenteeism are closely related to poverty, and that poverty is not necessarily related to orphanhood. …

  9. Girls, women and HIV/AIDS in eastern Africa

    A desk review based on studying available literature on girls, women and HIV/AIDS in eastern Africa. This study focuses on girls, women and HIV/AIDS in Eastern African Region. It covers Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Rwanda and Burundi. The focus of the study was to get a comprehensive understanding of the issues of girls, women and HIV/AIDS in the region. It is also a contribution of UNICEF ESAR in the review of the status of women, girls and HIV/AIDS ten years since the Beijing Conference. …

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