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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The association between being currently in school and HIV prevalence among young women in nine eastern and southern African countries

    Interventions to keep adolescent girls and young women in school, or support their return to school, are hypothesised to also reduce HIV risk. Such interventions are included in the DREAMS combination package of evidence-based interventions. Although there is evidence of reduced risky sexual behaviours, the impact on HIV incidence is unclear. We used nationally representative surveys to investigate the association between being in school and HIV prevalence.

  2. The effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence in young women in rural South Africa (HPTN 068): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial

    Cash transfers have been proposed as an intervention to reduce HIV-infection risk for young women in sub-Saharan Africa. However, scarce evidence is available about their effect on reducing HIV acquisition. The authors aimed to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence among young women in rural South Africa. Based on their research findings, the authors draw the conclusion that cash transfers conditional on school attendance did not reduce HIV incidence in young women. School attendance significantly reduced risk of HIV acquisition, irrespective of study group. …

  3. Risk for coerced sex among female youth in Ghana: Roles of family context, school enrollment and relationship experience

    CONTEXT: A better understanding is needed of the variables that may influence the risk of experiencing coerced sex among adolescent females in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Data were collected from 700 female respondents who were interviewed in 2010 and 2012 waves of a longitudinal study of behavioral risk for HIV infection among youth aged 13–14 or 18–19 and living in two towns in southeastern Ghana. …

  4. Education and vulnerability: the role of schools in protecting young women and girls from HIV in southern Africa

    Education has a potentially important role to play in tackling the spread of HIV, but is there evidence that this potential is realized? This analysis combines the results of previous literature reviews and updates them with the findings of recent randomized controlled trials and a discussion of possible mechanisms for the effect of schooling on vulnerability to HIV infection. There is a growing body of evidence that keeping girls in school reduces their risk of contracting HIV. …

  5. Zimbabwe national strategic plan for the education of girls, orphans and other vulnerable children 2005-2010

    Guided by the overall principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Zimbabwean education act, the national policy on gender, the Orphan Care Policy and National Plan of Action for Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children, the proposed five year National Girls' Education strategic plan aims to accelerate Zimbabwe's progress towards UPE in the context of gender and other social asymmetries in accessing education. …

  6. Orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa: findings from a national representative survey

    We examined the association of orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa. In South Africa, school attendance is compulsory through grade 9, which should be completed before age 16. However, family and social factors such as orphanhood and poverty can hinder educational attainment. Participants were 10,452 16-24-year-olds who completed a South African national representative household survey. Overall, 23% had not completed compulsory school levels. …

  7. Reasons for non-attendance of orphans, children from disjointed families who live with both parents: Evidence from questionnaires and children's drawings

    The paper uses a combination of questionnaire data and children's drawings to explore the reasons contributing to temporary and permanent absence from school of orphans, children from disjointed families and children who live with both parents. Particular attention is paid to differences between these three groups of children and between girls and boys. It is shown that the most important reasons for absenteeism are closely related to poverty, and that poverty is not necessarily related to orphanhood. …

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