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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Cash transfers: magic bullet or fundamental ingredient?

    Comment on a study published in The Lancet Global Health by Audrey Pettifor and colleagues on cash transfers, school attendance and the reduction of HIV risk behaviours in adolescent girls.

  2. The effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence in young women in rural South Africa (HPTN 068): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial

    Cash transfers have been proposed as an intervention to reduce HIV-infection risk for young women in sub-Saharan Africa. However, scarce evidence is available about their effect on reducing HIV acquisition. The authors aimed to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence among young women in rural South Africa. Based on their research findings, the authors draw the conclusion that cash transfers conditional on school attendance did not reduce HIV incidence in young women. School attendance significantly reduced risk of HIV acquisition, irrespective of study group. …

  3. Risk for coerced sex among female youth in Ghana: Roles of family context, school enrollment and relationship experience

    CONTEXT: A better understanding is needed of the variables that may influence the risk of experiencing coerced sex among adolescent females in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Data were collected from 700 female respondents who were interviewed in 2010 and 2012 waves of a longitudinal study of behavioral risk for HIV infection among youth aged 13–14 or 18–19 and living in two towns in southeastern Ghana. …

  4. Education and vulnerability: the role of schools in protecting young women and girls from HIV in southern Africa

    Education has a potentially important role to play in tackling the spread of HIV, but is there evidence that this potential is realized? This analysis combines the results of previous literature reviews and updates them with the findings of recent randomized controlled trials and a discussion of possible mechanisms for the effect of schooling on vulnerability to HIV infection. There is a growing body of evidence that keeping girls in school reduces their risk of contracting HIV. …

  5. Zimbabwe national strategic plan for the education of girls, orphans and other vulnerable children 2005-2010

    Guided by the overall principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Zimbabwean education act, the national policy on gender, the Orphan Care Policy and National Plan of Action for Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children, the proposed five year National Girls' Education strategic plan aims to accelerate Zimbabwe's progress towards UPE in the context of gender and other social asymmetries in accessing education. …

  6. The impact of HIV/AIDS on the schooling of female students in Addis Ababa

    In Ethiopia, in 2003, 2.9 million adults and 250 000 children are living with HIV/AIDS. About 90% of the reported AIDS cases are between the age 20 and 49 and this age group is among the productive sector. However, research has revealed (UNESCO Prospect Vol. XXXIII No. 2 June, 2002) that education about sex, AIDS and health in general particularly with children and young people, does not result in increased sexual activity but, on the contrary, leads to protective behaviour. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. …

  7. Keeping the promise: five benefits of girls' secondary education

    Countries around the world have achieved huge gains in primary education, reaching a world average of 83.8 percent in net primary enrollment. However, large numbers of students still do not complete primary education, and even fewer continue on to secondary school. Since so few children complete primary school, those who do must be able to continue their schooling. It is the only way for students and society to reap the full benefits of their initial investment in a literate, educated population. …

  8. Educate girls fight AIDS

    Growing evidence shows that getting and keeping young people in school, particularly girls, dramatically lowers their vulnerability to HIV. By itself, merely attending primary school makes young people significantly less likely to contract HIV. When young people stay in school through the secondary level, education's protective effect against HIV is even more pronounced. …

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