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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence in young women in rural South Africa (HPTN 068): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial

    Cash transfers have been proposed as an intervention to reduce HIV-infection risk for young women in sub-Saharan Africa. However, scarce evidence is available about their effect on reducing HIV acquisition. The authors aimed to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence among young women in rural South Africa. Based on their research findings, the authors draw the conclusion that cash transfers conditional on school attendance did not reduce HIV incidence in young women. School attendance significantly reduced risk of HIV acquisition, irrespective of study group. …

  2. Accessing the ‘right’ kinds of material and symbolic capital: the role of cash transfers in reducing adolescent school absence and risky behaviour in South Africa

    This article investigates how well South Africa’s Child Support Grant (CSG) responds to the material and psychosocial needs of adolescents, and the resultant effects on schooling and risky behaviour. One driver of schooling decisions is shame related to poverty and the ‘social cost’ of school, where a premium must often be paid for fashionable clothes or accessories. The other driver relates to symbolic and consumptive capital gained through engaging in sexual exchange relationships. The anticipated impacts from the CSG are partial because of these non-material drivers of adolescent choices. …

  3. Measures for the prevention and management of learner pregnancy. Choose to wait for a brighter future

    This document aims to clarify the position of the department of Education regarding learner pregnancies. The measures provide a framework for: educating and assisting learners to understand and exercise their rights and responsibilities in regard to healthy lifestyles; guiding and supporting vulnerable learners; and involving all relevant role-players, and integrating these measures with available systems and structures.

  4. Violence in primary schools in Southern and Eastern Africa: Some evidence from SACMEQ

    Special attention was given to the issues related to school violence in the studies conducted by a consortium known as Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ). These issues were included in the form of research questions which sought information on pupils’ and teachers’ behavioural problems at the primary school level. This paper addresses the following three research questions: (1) What were the changes in the perceived occurrence of school violence in SACMEQ school systems between 2000 and 2007? …

  5. Teen mothers and schooling: lacunae and challenges

    While many girls who become mothers before completing schooling consider academic qualifications to be very important, they may not be able to succeed academically if the support they need to complete their studies is insufficient. Usually, instead of getting support, the teen mothers endure misunderstandings and pressure. The teen mothers may feel disempowered because they are ‘othered’ and consequently, they develop forms of resistance which in most cases may foster their failure as learners. …

  6. Books and babies. Pregnancy and young parents in schools

    Being pregnant and a young parent in South African schools is not easy. Books and Babies examines why this is the case. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative research conducted in secondary schools in Durban and Cape Town, the book explores how teachers and principals respond to the presence of pregnant learners and young parents in school, and surveys the attitudes of fellow learners towards them. …

  7. WASH in schools empowers girls' education. Proceedings of the menstrual hygiene mananagement in schools virtual conference 2013

    There is increasing interest in exploring and addressing the menstrual hygiene management (MHM) barriers facing schoolgirls and female teachers in educational settings. Around the globe, WASH in Schools (WinS) focuses on fostering social inclusion and individual self-respect – and addresses MHM as a key agenda. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, integrating MHM into WinS empowers all students, and especially encourages girls and female teachers. …

  8. A Review of education policy to address the active and passive exclusion of learners affected by HIV and AIDS from attending or participating in schooling

    The study focuses on four key barriers to education, which are most prominent for children affected by HIV and AIDS, namely: HIV/AIDS-related illness of learners; Grief and trauma associated with illness and death of family/household members; Increased domestic responsibility (and exploitation through child labour) for children affected by AIDS; HIV- and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination.

  9. The association between school attendance, HIV infection and sexual behaviour among young people in rural South Africa

    Objectives: To investigate whether the prevalence of HIV infection among young people, and sexual behaviours associated with increased HIV risk, are differentially distributed between students and those not attending school or college. Design: A random population sample of unmarried young people (916 males, 1003 females) aged 14–25 years from rural South Africa in 2001. Methods: Data on school attendance and HIV risk characteristics came from structured face-to-face interviews. HIV serostatus was assessed by oral fluid ELISA. …

  10. Orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa: findings from a national representative survey

    We examined the association of orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa. In South Africa, school attendance is compulsory through grade 9, which should be completed before age 16. However, family and social factors such as orphanhood and poverty can hinder educational attainment. Participants were 10,452 16-24-year-olds who completed a South African national representative household survey. Overall, 23% had not completed compulsory school levels. …

  11. Non-consensual sex, school enrolment and education outcomes in South Africa

    Sexual violence is a significant problem in South Africa. Such encounters bring psychological trauma, social stigma, and the risk of pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Existing qualitative research indicates that survivors have difficulty concentrating on school-work, with many reportedly losing interest and some leaving school. The relationship between these experiences and school enrolment and educational attainment has not been quantified in sub-Saharan Africa. …

  12. South African national HIV prevalence, incidence, behaviour and communication survey, 2008: the health of our children

    The main rationale for this study was to better understand the health status of South African children in relation to HIV. Children have not been adequately included in national health surveys such as the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and this study allowed for the assessment of progress towards the realisation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the attainment of the National Strategic Plan targets in South Africa. …

  13. Where have all the flowers gone? A preliminary analysis of the decline in first year school enrolment in KwaZulu Natal and possible links to HIV/AIDS

    Enrolment is the single most important statistic in education, given its impact on every other element of supply and demand. The purpose of the analysis is to explore possible reasons forthe decline in first year school enrolment in KwaZulu Natal and suggest that the impact of HIV/AIDS may be a significant factor. It will also argue that if indeed HIV/AIDS is partially or even largely responsible for the decline, it is first and foremost a management issue of the greatest importance, irrespective of the problem's source. …

  14. The Current and Future Impact of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic on South Africa's Children

    This chapter has three aims. One, to investigate the impacts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic upon the children of South Africa with a focus on health, welfare and education implications. Two, to examine the responses of families, communities, civil society and governments to the crisis confronting the children. Three, to critique those responses and offer alternatives, which may assist in improving the impacts on children.

  15. Quantifying effects of illness and death on education at school level: implications for HIV/AIDS responses

    The purpose of this project was to quantify and understand impacts of HIV/AIDS on education, many of which will be carried by poor households and communities, and provide information to feed into multi-sectoral strategy to mitigate negative impacts. Schools and school communities are critical points of intervention in South Africa.

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