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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Menstruation and education in Nepal

    This paper presents the results from a randomized evaluation that distributed menstrual cups (menstrual sanitary products) to adolescent girls in rural Nepal. Girls in the study were randomly allocated a menstrual cup for use during their monthly period and were followed for fifteen months to measure the effects of having modern sanitary products on schooling. While girls were 3 percentage points less likely to attend school on days of their period, the researchers find no significant effect of being allocated a menstrual cup on school attendance. …

  2. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education in Masbate Province and Metro Manila, Philippines: An assessment of menstrual hygiene management in schools

    Emory University, UNICEF Philippines, Plan Philippines and Save the Children Philippines carried out a qualitative assessment of menstruation-related challenges girls face in school. Girls, boys, teachers and mothers at 10 schools in Masbate Province and the National Capital Region were interviewed for their opinions. This report highlights the challenges girls face in school during menses, describes the determinants of these challenges, and outlines the educational and health impacts of these challenges as voiced by the participants. …

  3. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education. Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2012

    WASH in Schools (WinS) fosters social inclusion and individual self-respect. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, it empowers all students – and especially encourages girls and female teachers. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ school attendance and achievement, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs through WinS programming. …

  4. WASH in schools empowers girls' education. Proceedings of the menstrual hygiene mananagement in schools virtual conference 2013

    There is increasing interest in exploring and addressing the menstrual hygiene management (MHM) barriers facing schoolgirls and female teachers in educational settings. Around the globe, WASH in Schools (WinS) focuses on fostering social inclusion and individual self-respect – and addresses MHM as a key agenda. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, integrating MHM into WinS empowers all students, and especially encourages girls and female teachers. …

  5. Menstruation, sanitary products and school attendance: Evidence from a randomized evaluation

    Policy-makers have cited menstruation and lack of sanitary products as barriers to girls' schooling. We evaluate these claims using a randomized evaluation of sanitary products provision to girls in Nepal. We report two findings. First, menstruation has a very small impact on school attendance: we estimate that girls miss a total of 0.4 days in a 180 day school year. Second, improved sanitary technology has no effect on reducing this (small) gap: girls who randomly received sanitary products were no less likely to miss school during their period. …

  6. Compendium Afghanistan: National and international commitments on the equal right of all children to quality education in inclusive and child-friendly settings

    This Compendium brings together in one document all the main conventions, declarations, and laws that support the right of all the children of Afghanistan. It is designed to help ensure that all children are able to realise their right to access quality education in schools that are both inclusive and child-friendly. Inclusive and child-friendly education is a developmental approach seeking to address the individual learning needs of all children, with special focus on those children who are vulnerable to marginalisation from and within the education system.

  7. Rethinking school health: a key component of Education for All

    For the goals of Education for All (EFA) to be achieved, children must be healthy enough not only to attend school but also to learn while there. Because school health and nutrition programs specifically benefit poor, sick, and hungry children, they can make a key contribution to achieving EFA's goals. However, children can benefit only if the programs reach them. …

  8. Adolescents and youth in Pakistan 2001-2002: a nationally representative survey

    The Adolescents and Youth in Pakistan 2001-2002: A Nationally Representative Survey (AYSP) was funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, the Department for International Development (UK), and UNICEF (Pakistan). The AYSP provides an unprecedented view of young Pakistani people's experiences with and attitudes about education, employment, families, and marriage. The survey explores the transition to adulthood of Pakistani adolescents and the social and economic forces that shape the transition. …

  9. Adolescents in India: a profile

    The report presents a situation analysis of adolescents in India, adolescents in the UN system, review of government policies and programmes related to adolescents, NGO activities and programmes on adolescents at a glance.

  10. A look at Asia's changing youth population

    This issue of Asia-Pacific Population & Policy highlights findings from recent East-West Center study on demographic and social changes among young people in Asia. The project, supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development through The Population Council, covered 17 countries in East, Southeast, and South Asia. It brought together information on the changing numbers of young people aged 15-24 and on trends in marriage, school enrollment, and workforce participation among youth population in the region.

  11. Reaching the Poor: The 'cost' of sending children to school: a six country comparative study

    This comparative research study focuses on the main barriers to education for the poorest households in Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Uganda and Zambia. Although the study set out primarily to look at the burden of education costs on the poorest households very rich data on other barriers to education (e.g. physical access, quality of education, vulnerability, poverty, and health) have been gathered and are discussed. The study looks at what motivates parents to send their children to school (and keep them there) through their perceptions of the quality and value of education. …

  12. Educational attainment and HIV-1 infection in developing countries: a systematic review

    Objectives: To assess whether educational status is associated with HIV-1 infection in developing countries by conducting a systematic review of published literature. Methods: Articles were identified through electronic databases and hand searching key journals. …

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