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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. LGBT action plan 2018: improving the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people

    With over 75 commitments, the cross-Government plan sets out how the Government will improve the lives of LGBT people. Some of the key actions include: Appointing a national LGBT health adviser to provide leadership on reducing the health inequalities that LGBT people face; Extending the anti-homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying programme in schools; Bringing forward proposals to end the practice of conversion therapy in the UK; and Taking further action on LGBT hate crime – improving the recording and reporting of, and police response to, hate crime.

  2. Evaluation of an anti-homophobic, biphobic and transphobic (HB&T) bullying programme

    Over the last two decades real progress has been made towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGB&T) equality in Britain. Yet, the government acknowledges that too many LGB&T people still face prejudice because of their sexual orientation or gender identity at every stage in their lives. This includes homophobic, biphobic and transphobic (HB&T) bullying in schools, which, despite efforts, remains a problem. Preventing and tackling HB&T bullying in schools is important because it can stop LGB&T people reaching their full potential. …

  3. Guidelines for inclusive education: sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression

    Evidence from IGLYO’s members as well as research from various countries worldwide has shown a continued need for school systems to implement inclusive policies and activities across Europe. School bullying based on real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression – referred to as homophobic and transphobic bullying - constitutes a violation of the human right to education. …

  4. HIV in schools: a good practice guide to supporting children living with and affected by HIV

    Schools are an important part of a child's life and provide a supportive, caring environment. Yet still in 2015, the reactions of staff, parent/carers or pupils, to a child who is living with or affected by HIV, have in some cases led to the child feeling unable to remain at that school. This guidance by Magda Conway is an update of the comprehensive resource published by NCB in 2005, and a collaboration between the Children's HIV Association (CHIVA) and NCB. …

  5. Anti-bullying procedures for primary and post primary schools

    The purpose of these procedures is to give direction and guidance to school authorities and school personnel in preventing and tackling school-based bullying behaviour amongst its pupils and in dealing with any negative impact within school of bullying behaviour that occurs elsewhere. These procedures apply to all recognised primary and post primary schools and to centres for education (as defined in the Education Act 1998) which are attended by pupils under the age of 18 years.

  6. Action on bullying. A review of the effectiveness of action taken by schools to address bullying on the grounds of pupil's protected characteristics

    This report is published in response to a request for advice from the Welsh Government in the Minister’s annual remit letter to Estyn for 2013-2014. The report examines the effectiveness of action taken by schools to address bullying, with particular reference to bullying on the grounds of pupils’ protected characteristics (age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation). The report includes case studies of best practice illustrating how the best practice schools deal with bullying. …

  7. Reducing bullying amongst the worst affected

    Bullying Affects the Majority of School Children in the UK. 1. Bullying affects most school children at some point, either as a victim, a bully or as a bystander. 2. The worst-affected groups, such as those with SEN, experience bullying more frequently, intensively and persistently. 3. The causes of bullying are usually similar; it comes from a drive to demonstrate or experiment with social power and often focuses on the perceived 'difference' of a victim. 4. …

  8. Rights Against INtolerance Building an Open-minded World, RAINBOW Toolkit

    The project connects EU gay and lesbian associations, schools, media professionals promoting the rights of children and young people to their sexual identity and orientation and who fight against homophobia, in order to A) study stereotypes and B) challenge them.

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