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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Résultats de l’enquête de climat scolaire et victimation auprès des lycéens pour l’année scolaire 2017-2018

    En 2018, 94 % des lycéens déclarent se sentir bien dans leur établissement. Ce taux est stable depuis 2011, quelle que soit la population interrogée (lycéens ou collégiens). Toutefois, l’indice de climat scolaire connaît une légère baisse qui est en partie due à une opinion un peu moins favorable pour les filles. Le recul des opinions positives se constate pour les questions relatives à la sécurité à l’extérieur du lycée. La nature des violences subies n’a pas changé : les vols de fournitures, les mises à l’écart et les surnoms désagréables sont toujours les atteintes les plus citées. …

  2. Les violences sexistes à l’école, une oppression viriliste

    Ce livre est composé de témoignages, recueillis individuellement ou en groupe, et de principaux résultats d’enquêtes ayant permis d’interroger 47604 élèves âgés de 8 à 19 ans. Il s’attache à décrire la violence « ordinaire » en milieu scolaire, sa fréquence, ses caractéristiques et, la manière différenciée – ou non – dont elle touche les filles et les garçons.

  3. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education: Proceedings of the 5th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools

    Capturing girls’ voices: Channelling girls’ recommendations into global and national level action. Globally, there are around 600 million adolescent girls. Adolescence is a pivotal transitional period that requires special attention to ensure progress for all girls, especially the most vulnerable, and poses a unique opportunity to break intergenerational cycles of poverty and to transform gender roles. The onset of puberty and menstruation can pose an additional barrier to a girl’s personal freedom, and can signal entry into a different role in their family and wider society. …

  4. Menstrual hygiene in schools in two countries of francophone West Africa: Burkina Faso and Niger. Case studies in 2013

    Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) has been under-researched by the WASH, health and education sectors. Menstruation is a sensitive subject and remains a taboo in many societies. Some cultural beliefs about menstruation reinforce gender inequities and have negative impact on the dignity, health and education of women and girls. There is a need to gather more information on MHM to improve WASH in schools programming and create more equal, safe and healthy school environments. …

  5. MHM in Ten: advancing the MHM agenda in WASH in schools

    In recent years, there has been growing attention to the challenges faced by menstruating schoolgirls in low- and middle-income countries. A solid body of research conducted across numerous countries and contexts has documented menstruating girls’ experiences of shame. The evidence has revealed the discriminatory nature of many school environments, with menstruating girls (and female teachers) unable to adequately manage their monthly menses with safety, dignity and privacy. This, in turn, may have negative impacts on girls’ ability to succeed and thrive within the school environment. …

  6. Menstrual hygiene management impacts girls’ school experience in the Bolivian Amazon

    The purpose of this study on menstrual hygiene management (MHM) in the Beni department of Bolivia was to better understand the challenges girls face due to menstruation; describe factors which influence girls’ experiences during menstruation; and present recommendations to create a supportive school environment for adolescent girls in Bolivia. This study complements the findings of the first MHM study undertaken in Cochabamba, Bolivia in 2012, by providing information specific to the Amazonian population of the eastern lowlands of Bolivia. …

  7. Engaging school personnel in making schools safe for girls in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique

    Girls are vulnerable to HIV in part because the social systems in which they live have failed to protect them. This study evaluates a program aimed at making schools safe for girl learners in order to reduce girls’ vulnerability to HIV in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique. In addition to an extensive process evaluation with school personnel program participants, program facilitators, and community members, a cross-sectional post-intervention survey was conducted among adolescent girls in the three countries. The total sample size was 1249 adolescent girls (ages 11–18). …

  8. When caring is not enough: The limits of teachers’ support for South African primary school-girls in the context of sexual violence

    Between 2011 and 2012, 40.1% of all sexual offences in South Africa involved children under 18. Important scholarship has demonstrated how large-scale social and economic inequalities structure African girls’ risk to and experience of sexual violence leading to a condemnation of violent masculinities and the social processes that produce it. Under conditions of chronic poverty and unstable living conditions, girls’ vulnerability to sexual violence is increased. …

  9. Guidelines for the re-entry policy. What happens if a school-girl falls pregnant?

    In this booklet you can learn more about the re-entry policy guidelines and what actions you can take to ensure that all children, including young mothers, get their right to education fulfilled.

  10. Violences de genre en milieu scolaire (VGMS). Vadémécum sur la recherche au sujet des violences de genre en milieu scolaire en Afrique : mesurer, comprendre, rendre visible

    Ce document est basé sur les résultats d’une discussion en ligne au sujet des recherches sur les violences de genre en milieu scolaire qui a eu lieu en février 2013, animée par Genre en Action. Les éléments échangés sont complétés par des éléments de littérature (voir bibliographie) et par les travaux du groupe de travail « violences de genre en milieu scolaire ».

  11. Leadership and joint action to eliminate school-related gender-based violence: International partners meeting report

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is a global problem that knows no geographical, cultural, social, economic, ethnic, or other boundaries. It occurs across all societies, represents a violation of human rights, and is a major obstacle to the achievement of gender equality.School-related GBV (SRGBV) continues to be a serious barrier to fulfilling the right to education, especially for girls, and undermines their experience of school as a safe space for learning. Prevalence of SRGBV is one of the key factors for low quality of school education for girls and boys. …

  12. Intervention and results of combating school-related gender-based violence in Democratic Republic of Congo

    This powerpoint presents the outcome of a project which aimed to promote positive social and gender norms to prevent and mitigate SRGBV in Katanga Province, DRC. …

  13. Integrating gender and gender-based violence into HIV programs

    The vision of the Mozambique President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Gender-Based Violence Initiative (GBVI) is to reduce incidence of gender-based violence (GBV) and to create a social and institutional environment that protects women and girls and offers services of protection and help to survivors. A joint U.S. Government, Government of Mozambique, and civil society team led and developed the GBVI plan, which was informed by a wide stakeholder consultation held in August 2010. …

  14. Gender based violence in South African schools

    This paper looks at issues of gender-based violence in the education sector in South Africa through a review of literature and statistics of recent research by international organizations.

  15. Boys are more vulnerable than girls to school-related gender-based violence: results from a survey in Zambia

    In Zambia, 47% percent of women aged 15-49 have ever experienced physical violence & 15% experienced sexual and/or gender-based violence (DHS 2007). School-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) is a global problem with serious implications for individual and population health and education outcomes. SRGBV results in sexual, physical, or psychological harm to girls and boys. SRGBV may include any form of violence or abuse based on gendered stereotypes or that targets students on the basis of their sex. …

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