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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in schools: global baseline report 2018

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) are responsible for monitoring global progress towards water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) related Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets. The global effort to achieve sanitation and water for all by 2030 is extending beyond the household to include institutional settings, such as schools, healthcare facilities and workplaces. This joint report is the first comprehensive global assessment of WASH in schools and establishes a baseline for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) period.

  2. SABER school health: preliminary assessment of school health policies in the Caribbean community (CARICOM)

    This report presents the findings of the 2012 pilot assessment of the school health policies for the following Caribbean community (CARICOM) countries: Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, St. Lucia, Barbados, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The objective of this exercise is to help countries to identify the strengths and weaknesses in their school health policy frameworks, with the understanding that sound a policy framework is a critical component of effective school health programming. …

  3. Report of the working group on educational materials for use in SPHE in post-primary schools and centres for education with particular reference to substance use education in the context of SPHE

    This Report sets out the current context for Social, Personal and Health Education (SPHE) in Chapter Two. It notes the approval of an integrated SPHE curriculum for Junior Cycle in 2000 along with the establishment of the SPHE Post-Primary Support Service which was a collaborative initiative with the Department of Health. The SPHE Curriculum was introduced to primary schools from 1999 and the SPHE curriculum for post-primary schools was introduced in 2003. …

  4. Report of the commission on ending childhood obesity

    Childhood obesity undermines the physical, social and psychological well-being of children and is a known risk factor for adult obesity and noncommunicable diseases. There is an urgent need to act now to improve the health of this generation and the next. The Commission recognizes that the scope of potential policy recommendations to address childhood obesity is broad and contains a number of novel elements. …

  5. Results from the School Health Policies and Practices Study 2014

    This report provides results from the SHPPS conducted in 2014. Following a detailed Methods section, 2014 results are presented in a series of 168 tables organized around the 10 components of the WSCC model. Tables 1.1 through 10.4 provide the percentage of schools or classes with certain policies and practices in place; these results are shown separately for each school level—elementary school, middle school, and high school. For each variable, the prevalence estimate is shown along with a 95% confidence interval. …

  6. Drug prevention programmes in schools: what is the evidence?

    Key messages: Universal drug education programmes in schools have been shown to have an impact on the most common substances used by young people: alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. The approaches which appear to be most effective are those based on social influences and life skills, for example Life Skills Training and Unplugged. Interventions which are not drug-specific but focus on children and young people’s attachment to school can also be effective in reducing substance misuse. The Good Behaviour Game is one example of these. …

  7. The health promoting school: international advances in theory, evaluation and practice

    In the 1990s, the European Network of Health Promoting Schools was founded by the European Commission and WHO's Regional Office for Europe after a number of conferences and workshops on the settings-based approach to health. …

  8. Summary of the report Child-friendly Community Schools' Approach for Promoting Health, Psychosocial Development, and Resilience in Children and Youth Affected by AIDS by the Thai Lifeskills Development Foundation (Chiang Mai), 1998

    Summary of the report Child-friendly Community Schools' Approach for Promoting Health, Psychosocial Development, and Resilience in Children and Youth Affected by AIDS by the Thai Lifeskills Development Foundation (Chiang Mai), 1998

  9. Health promoting schools initiative: a project of the Child, Adolescent and Young Adult Health and Wellness Unit, Ministry of Health Guyana

    The main thrust of the initiative has been the formation of school health clubs in secondary level schools throughout Guyana. These health clubs are intended to be a way for young people to be positively engaged in productive activities, learn about healthy behaviours and lifestyles, take responsibility for their own health and health promotion in their schools, and generate positive peer norms as they make the transition from childhood to adulthood. The intention is for every secondary level school in the country to have its own health club.

  10. Child-friendly Community Schools approach for promoting health, psychosocial development and resilience in children and youth affected by HIV/AIDS

    The following report is a compilation of all implemented activities and results derived from the Child Friendly Schools project for AIDS affected children in three provinces of northern Thailand. The report outlines the methodology utilized and highlights the best practices and lessons learnt during the planning and implementation period of the project. The report illustrates the crucial importance of incorporating communities into the planning and implementation process of any intended development project. …

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