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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Safe schools: the hidden crisis. A framework for action to deliver safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments

    This report brings together, for the first time: A global picture of the range of threats posed to schools and learning environments, from conflict, violent extremism and environmental disasters, to less commonly covered threats such as gang violence, bullying, school-based sexual abuse, and corporal punishment; New analysis indicating the scale of the challenge of delivering schools — from the countries worst affected, to the number of children and young people under threat, the impact these threats have their individual life chances, and wider implications of inaction for national and intern …

  2. Keeping children safe in education: statutory guidance for schools and colleges

    This is statutory guidance from the Department for Education issued under Section 175 of the Education Act 2002, the Education (Independent School Standards) Regulations 2014, and the Non-Maintained Special Schools (England) Regulations 2015. Schools and colleges in England must have regard to it when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

  3. Résultats de l’enquête de climat scolaire et victimation auprès des lycéens pour l’année scolaire 2017-2018

    En 2018, 94 % des lycéens déclarent se sentir bien dans leur établissement. Ce taux est stable depuis 2011, quelle que soit la population interrogée (lycéens ou collégiens). Toutefois, l’indice de climat scolaire connaît une légère baisse qui est en partie due à une opinion un peu moins favorable pour les filles. Le recul des opinions positives se constate pour les questions relatives à la sécurité à l’extérieur du lycée. La nature des violences subies n’a pas changé : les vols de fournitures, les mises à l’écart et les surnoms désagréables sont toujours les atteintes les plus citées. …

  4. Protocol for the management and reporting of sexual abuse and harassment in schools

    The purpose of the Protocol for the management and reporting of sexual abuse and harassment is to provide schools, districts and provinces with standard operating procedures for addressing allegations, and to specifically detail how schools must respond to reports of sexual abuse and harassment perpetrated against learners, educators and other school staff. Schools are mandated to assist victims of sexual abuse and harassment by following standard reporting procedures and through the provision of appropriate support to learners.

  5. Do both boys and girls feel safe at school – and does it matter?

    The relationship between feeling safe in school and academic achievement differs between boys and girls, and also varies between countries. Educational policymakers are advised to carefully analyze the complex interplay between gender, grade level and national contexts when developing strategies to enhance school safety.

  6. Behind the numbers: ending school violence and bullying

    School-related violence in all its forms, including bullying, is an infringement of children’s and adolescents’ rights to education and health and well-being.

  7. National strategic plan on violence against children in schools [2015-2020]

    Access to education is one of the fundamental rights of every child which should be delivered in a conducive and safe learning environment. With the introduction of Universal Primary Education (UPE) and the Universal Secondary Education (USE), the Government of Uganda has greatly improved primary and secondary school enrolment for both girls and boys including those with disabilities. For these programmes to be effective, children need to access quality education in a safe learning environment. …

  8. Reporting, tracking, referral and response (RTRR) guidelines on violence against children in schools

    Access to education is one of the fundamental rights of every child which should be delivered in a conducive and safe learning environment. With the introduction of Universal Primary Education (UPE) and the Universal Secondary Education (USE) , the Government of Uganda has greatly improved primary and secondary school enrolment for both girls and boys including those with disabilities. For these programmes to be effective, children need to access quality education and complete the education cycle in an environment free from violence. …

  9. Journeys: activity handbook for teachers and school staff

    The objective of the Journeys Activity Handbook for Teachers and School Staff is to mobilise school staff to take deliberate steps to increase, foster and promote a safe and caring school that is free from violence. A positive school climate includes norms, values and expectations that support people feeling socially, emotionally and physically safe. It also means that teachers are engaged and respected and pupils are cared about, encouraged and supported in a classroom that is free from violence. In addition all school staff and pupils contribute to keeping the school compound clean. …

  10. Let's decide how to measure school violence

    Violence in schools and other education settings causes serious harm to children and adolescents that can last into adulthood. As the UN World Report on Violence against Children observed, it is a global phenomenon. Policies, laws and strategies to prevent school-related violence depend on accurate knowledge of its global prevalence, trends and effects, but such evidence is lacking. This paper surveys current methods of assessing school-related violence and sets out options for improving the global evidence base.

  11. Stratégie intégrée de prévention et de lutte contre la violence à l’égard des enfants scolarisés

    Cette étude propose un rappel synthétique des connaissances concernant la violence à l’école et une analyse du cadre législatif et des réponses institutionnelles et non gouvernementales apportées à ce phénomène. …

  12. Violence in primary schools in Southern and Eastern Africa: Some evidence from SACMEQ

    Special attention was given to the issues related to school violence in the studies conducted by a consortium known as Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ). These issues were included in the form of research questions which sought information on pupils’ and teachers’ behavioural problems at the primary school level. This paper addresses the following three research questions: (1) What were the changes in the perceived occurrence of school violence in SACMEQ school systems between 2000 and 2007? …

  13. Tackling violence in school: A global perspective. Bridging the gap between standards and practice

    On any given day, more than one billion children around the world attend school. Many of these children enjoy their right to be taught in a safe and stimulating environment. For many others, however, schooling does not guarantee such opportunity. These girls and boys are exposed to bullying, sexual and gender-based violence, corporal punishment and other forms of violence with or without the approval of education authorities. Many are also exposed to schoolyard fighting, gang violence, assault with weapons, and sexual and gender-based violence by their own peers. …

  14. Stopping violence in schools: a guide for teachers

    Teachers and students can use this guide to address and prevent violence. School violence is an immensely complex issue and thus requires numerous factors to be addressed. Such factors include the need for student participation; a holistic approach involving parents, educators and the community; linking of policy, legislation and practice; the development of indicators on violence; and cultural sensitivity in addressing concepts such as the universality of human rights as part of a human rights-based approach. …

  15. Reducing bullying amongst the worst affected

    Bullying Affects the Majority of School Children in the UK. 1. Bullying affects most school children at some point, either as a victim, a bully or as a bystander. 2. The worst-affected groups, such as those with SEN, experience bullying more frequently, intensively and persistently. 3. The causes of bullying are usually similar; it comes from a drive to demonstrate or experiment with social power and often focuses on the perceived 'difference' of a victim. 4. …

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