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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Drug prevention programmes in schools: what is the evidence?

    Key messages: Universal drug education programmes in schools have been shown to have an impact on the most common substances used by young people: alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. The approaches which appear to be most effective are those based on social influences and life skills, for example Life Skills Training and Unplugged. Interventions which are not drug-specific but focus on children and young people’s attachment to school can also be effective in reducing substance misuse. The Good Behaviour Game is one example of these. …

  2. Drug education: an entitlement for all a report to government by the advisory group on drug and alcohol education

    Drug And Alcohol Advisory Group – Key Recommendations - Increase parents’ and carers’ knowledge and skills about drug and alcohol education and prevention enabling them to better inform and protect their children; - Improve the quality of drug and alcohol education by making PSHE a statutory subject – to enable schools and colleges to promote well-being effectively, and to improve the quality of training for PSHE teachers; and - Improve identification and support for young people vulnerable to drug misuse in schools, colleges and non-formal settings.

  3. The impact of homophobic and transphobic bullying on education and employment

    In February 2013, the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Youth and Student Organisation (IGLYO) commissioned Eleanor Formby from Sheffield Hallam University (in the UK) to carry out research on the impact of homophobic and transphobic bullying on education and employment in Europe. An online survey used, specifically targeted at a range of countries: Croatia, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and Poland. The research extends existing literature that often focuses on impacts on mental health and emotional wellbeing. …

  4. Acting against school bullying and violence: the role of media, local authorities and the Internet 

    This e-book builds on the discussions from five online conferences that brought together experts, professionals and others interested in the topic of school bullying and violence from throughout the world.

  5. The school report. The experiences of gay young people in Britain’s schools in 2012

    This report is based on a survey conducted by the Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge with young people who are lesbian, gay or bisexual (or think they might be), concerning their experiences in secondary schools and colleges across Britain. Key findings: - Homophobic bullying continues to be widespread in Britain’s schools. More than half (55 per cent) of lesbian, gay and bisexual pupils have experienced direct bullying; - The use of homophobic language is endemic. …

  6. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth with disabilities: a meta-synthesis

    This meta-synthesis of empirical and nonempirical literature analyzed 24 journal articles and book chapters that addressed the intersection of disability, [homo]sexuality, and gender identity/ expression in P-12 schools, colleges and universities, supported living programs, and other educational and social contexts in Australia, Belgium, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. …

  7. School-based lives of LGBT Youth in the Republic of Ireland

    There is a dearth of research on the experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth in schools in the Republic of Ireland. The current study assessed the school-based experiences of twenty five (N = 25) participants in the BeLonG To LGBT youth group in Dublin city using a mixed design survey instrument. …

  8. The experiences of young gay people in Britain's schools: the school report

    2006, Stonewall asked young people from Great Britain who are lesbian, gay, bisexual (or think they might be) to complete a survey about their experiences at school. The survey received 1145 responses from young people at secondary school. The survey was conducted by the Schools Health Education Unit on behalf of Stonewall. Just under half the respondents are girls (48 per cent). Fourteen per cent are from black and minority ethnic backgrounds and 12 per cent are disabled. Forty six per cent stated that they have a religious belief. Over half of these (29 per cent) are Christian. …

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