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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Violences de genre, violences sexistes à l’école. Tome 1

    Le dossier du présent numéro vise à éclairer la thématique des violences scolaires en proposant une analyse genrée ou sexuée du phénomène. Les contributions s’appuient sur des résultats de recherches empiriques et reposent sur des méthodologies explicites, qualitatives et/ ou quantitatives. Elles permettent non seulement de dresser un état des lieux des violences scolaires en fonction du sexe ou du genre des élèves (et/ ou des adultes) dans des contextes éducatifs variés, mais elles visent également à éclairer les mécanismes à l’origine de ces violences. …

  2. Ending school related gender violence in Nsanje district, Malawi: baseline study

    Concern Worldwide has initiated a project called Ending School Related Gender-Based Violence in Malawi to run from 2012 to 2015. The goal of the new program is that the right of girls to access quality primary education, free from all forms of violence and discrimination, be actively promoted by schools, communities and the State in Nsanje District. The expected outcomes of the program are: 1. A safe learning environment for girls is ensured in 17 primary schools in Nsanje; 2. …

  3. Addressing school related gender based violence: learning from practice

    This learning brief is based on research shared at a learning day on School Related Gender Based Violence (SRGBV), organised by the Irish Consortium on Gender Based Violence, at the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin Castle, on December 18th 2012. The principal inputs were provided by Máiréad Dunne, Director of the Centre for International Education at the University of Sussex, and Tanja Suvilaakso, Child Rights and Protection Advisor for Plan International. It builds on discussions within Learning Brief 2: Effective Responses for Gender Based Violence: Gender Based Violence in Schools.

  4. Violence against women and girls: education sector brief

    Experiencing violence in schools can negatively impact girls' enrollment as well as the quality of the education they receive. Evidence suggests that sexual harassment is widespread in educational settings in many parts of the world. Children who have witnessed violence at home or experienced violence have lower educational attainment. In Zambia, girls who experienced sexual violence were found to have more difficulty concentrating on studies, some students transferred to another school to escape harassment, and others dropped out of school because of pregnancy. …

  5. Outcome statement to mark the international day of the girl child: "Empowering adolescent girls: ending the cycle of violence"

    Outcome statement to mark the international day of the girl child: "Empowering adolescent girls: ending the cycle of violence"

  6. Victimes de l'école : les violences de genre en milieu scolaire, obstacles au droit des filles et des garçons à l’éducation

    Deuxième volet d’une série consacrée aux principaux freins à l’éducation des filles, ce rapport met en lumière les multiples défis à relever et dévoile différentes méthodes d’intervention utilisées par Plan International et ses partenaires pour lutter contre les violences de genre en milieu scolaire. Fondées sur les études et programmes réalisés par Plan International et ses partenaires, des recommandations sont illustrées par des cas concrets puisés dans différents pays d’intervention, en particulier dans la sous-région d’Afrique de l’Ouest et en Asie. …

  7. Making the grade. A model national policy for the prevention, management and elimination of violence against girls in school

    This model is designed to help SADC governments develop an integrated single comprehensive policy on violence against girls. It can be adapted to suit the local context because there is never a ‘one size fits all’ policy. Civil society groups and movements can use it as an advocacy tool in their negotiations with governments.

  8. Guidelines for supporting sexual and gender diversity in schools. Sexuality discrimination and homophobic bullying

    It is a fundamental right of every child and young person to feel safe in their school environment. Western Australian schools pride themselves on being safe and effective learning environments that cater for the diverse needs of all students, including those who are (LGBTI) lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and other sexuality, sex and gender diverse people. Recognising LGBTI students and staff as an everyday part of the social mix of the school community is important in responding appropriately to their needs. …

  9. Addressing the intergenerational transmission of gender-based violence: Focus on educational settings

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is increasingly recognized as a hindrance to economic and social development, in addition to violating the human rights of those experiencing it. Therefore, preventing the perpetration of GBV has ramifications beyond simply ending violence. Gender-based violence is violence perpetrated based on a person’s gender, and reflective of gender inequalities. Patriarchal social norms exist to varying degrees in almost every part of the world, often placing men and boys in dominant positions over women and girls. …

  10. Education sector policy for orphans and vulnerable children

    The goal of this policy is to ensure that an increased number of OVC are able to access, remain in, and complete general education of good quality. The objective of this policy is to ensure that all OVC of school-going age attend school and are not deterred from full participation through lack of financial means, material or psychosocial need, stigma, discrimination or any other constraints, and to ensure that out-of school OVC are brought back into school or provided with appropriate alternative educational opportunities.

  11. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education. Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2012

    WASH in Schools (WinS) fosters social inclusion and individual self-respect. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, it empowers all students – and especially encourages girls and female teachers. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ school attendance and achievement, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs through WinS programming. …

  12. The impact of homophobic and transphobic bullying on education and employment: Advocacy recommendations

    In 2013, IGLYO commissioned research that examined the experiences of homophobic and transphobic bullying within the educational context and its impact on employment and future career. An online survey targeted respondents in Croatia, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and Poland. The final results were drawn out of 187 survey responses, as well as a substantial number of complementary research reports.

  13. Promoting health in schools: from evidence to action

    This document complements the recommendations to establish and sustain health promotion in schools set out in the Guidelines to Promote Health in Schools document. It is an advocacy document for the health and education sectors to undertake school health promotion activities based on the evidence of effectiveness. The document provides succinct evidence-based arguments to support the need for school health promotion and advocates for a whole school (Health Promoting Schools) approach to strategically plan and implement school health initiatives. …

  14. Monitoring and evaluation of school-based health and nutrition programmes: A participative review

    Over the past two decades, many governments and organizations have renewed efforts to develop more effective school-based health and nutrition programmes in low income countries. In large part, this has resulted from the growing body of evidence linking children’s health and education; and the impact of school health and nutrition (SHN) programmes on improving these outcomes and contributing to Education for All (EFA) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). …

  15. Life skills curriculum for primary school teachers in Uganda

    Life skills have been defined by the World Health Organization as abilities for adaptive and positive behaviour that enable individuals to deal effectively with the demands and challenges of everyday life. Every education system, thus, has a duty to support the development of life skills among its clients in order to enable them function effectively in society. A study conducted to establish the extent to which teachers in primary schools were able to support learners in the development of Life skills revealed that many of them lacked the necessary competence to do so. …

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