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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Drug prevention programmes in schools: what is the evidence?

    Key messages: Universal drug education programmes in schools have been shown to have an impact on the most common substances used by young people: alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. The approaches which appear to be most effective are those based on social influences and life skills, for example Life Skills Training and Unplugged. Interventions which are not drug-specific but focus on children and young people’s attachment to school can also be effective in reducing substance misuse. The Good Behaviour Game is one example of these. …

  2. HIV eLearning and classroom research study. Comparing the use of eLearning to traditional classroom learning to enhance HIV knowledge uptake in life orientation in primary schools in the Western Cape, South Africa and in Dublin, Ireland

    This study sought to provide evidence whether eLearning compared to classroom instruction improved HIV knowledge uptake among learners between ages 11 – 16 years. Based on the study’s findings, the supporting education departments are strongly advised to consider implementing eLearning as a technique to transfer HIV knowledge to adolescents using a culturally-adapted and interactive platform.

  3. Live Safe, Play Safe: A life-skills course to protect children from HIV-infection - Facilitator's Guide, Chapter 5

    Live Safe, Play Safe is a skills-based health education program that protects children's health by enabling them to avoid HIV infection. Live Safe, Play Safe (LSPS) expands young people's awareness about HIV/AIDS and builds their skills in: - Negotiation; Assertiveness; Coping with peer pressure; Feeling compassion for those with HIV/AIDS. The course begins with basic, accurate information on the risks of unprotected intercourse and ways to avoid these risks. …

  4. RAP-Tool

    Youth Incentives, the international programme on sexuality developed by the Dutch expert centre on sexuality, Rutgers Nisso Groep, promotes the Dutch approach to the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) of young people. Core elements of this approach are represented in the RAP-rule, which stands for "Rights-based approach, Acceptance of young people's sexuality, and Participation of young people". This version of the RAP-tool is the result of experiences from pilot countries: Bangladesh, Eritrea, Rwanda and Tanzania. The RAP-tool is a needs assessment instrument guided by the RAP-rule. …

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