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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Teen pregnancy and high school dropout: what communities can do to address these issues

    The primary focus of this report is to highlight innovative ways school systems - particularly persistently low-achieving school districts with high teen birth rates - and public agencies and community-based organizations that oversee teen pregnancy prevention programs are working together with the common goal of helping students avoid too-early pregnancy and parenthood and complete their high school education. …

  2. Development of behaviour change communication (BCC) strategies for preventing adolescent pregnancy. Final project report

    The Department of Health (DOH) embarked on a Project entitled Development of Behavior Change Communication (BCC) Strategy for Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy as part of its Adolescent and Youth Health and Development (AYHD) Program. The Project generally aims to contribute to the reduction of adolescent pregnancy through behavior change communication strategies. It specifically seeks to promote positive and responsible sexual behavior among adolescents to enable them to prevent early and unintended adolescent pregnancy and its concomitant consequences. …

  3. Sex and relationships education fit for the 21st century: We need it now

    Evidence shows that good quality Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) helps young people develop and manage their emotional and physical well-being. While they can find out about sex and relationships in many ways – including from friends, TV programmes, magazines and the Internet – school SRE has an important role in presenting balanced, factually accurate and positive information that these other sources may not always provide.

  4. Educational access and HIV prevention: Making the case for education as a health priority in sub-Saharan Africa

    There is much evidence showing an association between sexual behavior and both attendance and attainment. Experimental evidence that school attendance leads to safer sexual behavior is currently under review. Studies suggest several pathways through which sexual behavior, and consequently the risk of HIV infection, may be influenced by schooling. Students attending school have a smaller sexual network and a stronger motivation to avoid the consequences of unprotected sex - both pregnancy and HIV infection - than their out-of-school peers.

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