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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Study of Family Planning and HIV Integrated Services in Five Countries

    In the past several years, there has been a growing international dialogue on the feasibility and desirability of providing integrated family planning (FP) and HIV services. The reasons for offering joint, complementary services are many. Adding FP services to counseling and testing might provide an opportunity to reach populations that do not typically attend FP clinics, such as the sexually active young and unmarried, men, and members of high-risk groups such as sex workers. …

  2. Siyam'kela: Measuring HIV/AIDS-related stigma, A literature review

    Stigma has been identified as a complex, diverse and deeply rooted phenomenon that is dynamic in different cultural settings. As a collective social process rather than a mere reflection of an individual's subjective behaviour, it operates by producing and reproducing social structures of power, hierarchy, class and exclusion and by transforming difference (class, race, ethnicity, health status, sexual orientation and gender) into inequality. This document is a literature review about stigma in every sense of the word.

  3. The Current and Future Impact of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic on South Africa's Children

    This chapter has three aims. One, to investigate the impacts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic upon the children of South Africa with a focus on health, welfare and education implications. Two, to examine the responses of families, communities, civil society and governments to the crisis confronting the children. Three, to critique those responses and offer alternatives, which may assist in improving the impacts on children.

  4. Predicting the social consequences of orphanhood in South Africa

    This paper examines and questions the predictions found in the academic and policy literature of social breakdown in Southern Africa in the wake of anticipated high rates of orphanhood caused by the AIDS epidemic. Analysis of the logic underlying these predictions reveals four causal relationships necessary to fulfil such dramatic and apocalyptic predictions:1. High AIDS mortality rates will produce high numbers of orphans.2. These orphans will become children who do not live in appropriate social environments to equip them for adult citizenship.3. …

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