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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Rethinking HIV/AIDS in South Africa: has the response been overmedicalized?

    This paper examines the potential impact of HIV/AIDS on different levels of South African society (individual, household, and national) over time. Using differences in demographic projections to guide the analysis, the prospective implications of HIV/AIDS on households, society, economy and nation are discussed and issues that could influence or mitigate those possible impacts are examined. …

  2. Who cares? AIDS Review 2001

    "Who cares?" looks at the levels of HIV/AIDS commitment and care - in the international community, in Africa and inSouth Africa. It askes the question "Who cares?" both in the sense of how we should think about care and commitment, and whether - beyond the rhetoric - we care at all."Who cares?" is largely a reflective document - one that will stir discussion, challenge and response.

  3. The effect of HIV/AIDS on educational attainment

    Using data from Demographic and Health Surveys for eleven countries in sub-Saharan Africa,the authorestimates the effect of local HIV prevalence on individual human capital investment. The authorfinds that the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reduced human capital investment: living in an area with higher HIV prevalence is associated with lower levels of completed schooling and slower progress through school. These results are consistent with a model of human capital investment in which parents and children respond to changes in the expected return to schooling driven by mortality risk.

  4. Orphanhood and schooling in South Africa: trends in the vulnerability of orphans between 1993 and 2005

    Using eleven nationally representative surveys conducted between 1993 and 2005 this paper assesses the extent to which the vulnerability of orphans to poorer educational outcomes has changed over time as the AIDS crisis deepens in South Africa. This paper seeks to establish whether the fear that extended families are no longer effective safety nets may be overstated or whether traditional coping strategies are indeed breaking down. Patterns of care giving for orphans do appear to be shifting over time but these changes are taking place within the extended family safety net. …

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