• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 9 results in 0.023 seconds.

Search results

  1. State of world population 2018: the power of choice: reproductive rights and the demographic transition

    The global trend towards smaller families is a reflection of people making reproductive choices to have as few or as many children as they want, when they want. When people lack choice, it can have a long-term impact on fertility rates, often making them higher or lower than what most people desire.

  2. It's good to teach them, but … they should also know when to apply it: parents’ views and attitudes towards Fiji's Family Life Education curriculum

    A Family Life Education (FLE) curriculum was introduced in Fiji schools in 2010 in response to concern about increasing teenage pregnancies and young people's vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections and other health and social problems. However, conservative and suspicious parental attitudes towards FLE have been an obstacle. The need for an educational programme for parents to complement the FLE curriculum taught in schools is now urgent. This study examines parents' views on the sex and sexuality component of the FLE curriculum. …

  3. Parent-child communication about sexual and reproductive health in rural Tanzania: Implications for young people's sexual health interventions

    Background: Many programmes on young people and HIV/AIDS prevention have focused on the in-school and channeled sexual and reproductive health messages through schools with limited activities for the young people's families. The assumption has been that parents in African families do not talk about sexual and reproductive health (SRH) with their children. These approach has had limited success because of failure to factor in the young person's family context, and the influence of parents. …

  4. Foundation for the future: meeting the psychosocial needs of children living with HIV in Africa

    This technical brief describes promising practices in critical services related to the psychological and social well-being of perinatally-infected children (aged 0 to 12 years) in Africa. These include the identification, testing, and counseling of children so that they are linked to appropriate support as early as possible, as well as the provision of ongoing PSS to help children and their families manage disclosure, stigma, and grief and bereavement processes. …

  5. Assessing implementation of Botswana's program for orphans and vulnerable children

    Botswana's 2008 National Guidelines on the Care of Orphans and Vulnerable Children define a vulnerable child as any child under the age of 18 years who lives in an abusive environment, a poverty-stricken family unable to access basic services, or a child-headed household; a child who lives with sick parents or outside family care; or who is HIV positive. Due to challenges in creating an effective response that corresponds to this broad definition, there are no available estimates of the number of children rendered vulnerable as a result of HIV, poverty, and other causes in Botswana. …

  6. The role of the health sector in strengthening systems to support children's healthy development in communities affected by HIV/AIDS: A review

    This document is a review of the scientic evidence and practice experience in providing what has come to be called psychosocial programming and support for children infected with and affected by HIV, and their caregivers. A great deal of attention is currently focused on psychosocial support programmes for children living in communities affected by HIV/AIDS. Efforts to promote the psychosocial well-being of vulnerable children require conditions and assistance that go beyond psychosocial support programmes. …

  7. Sex, kids and the family hour: a three-part study of sexual content on television

    The report summarizes the data collected in three separate studies commissioned by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Children Now about sexual messages on television and the impact of those messages on children and families. Contents:-Pt. 1. Family hour : sex, kids and the family hour : a three-part study of sexual content on television.-Pt. 2. Chart pack : sex, kids and the family hour : a three part study of sexual content on television.-Pt. 3. The family hour focus groups : children's responses to sexual content on TV and their parents' reactions.

  8. A Family is for a Lifetime: A discussion of the need for family care for children impacted by HIV/AIDS

    Part 1 of the document discusses the need for family care of children impacted by HIV/AIDS by looking at the universal standards of care, poverty, national policy and donor education. The document acknowledges the fact that there is no ideal solution to losing a parent but only better or worse alternatives and further says that the response to such loss matters a great deal to separated and orphaned children. Part 2 of the document contains an annotated bibliography on children without parental care.

  9. (Over) extended. AIDS Review 2003

    Review 2003 asks the question: how does the epidemic impact on families and the personal relationships between family members - between partners, between husbands and wives, between parents and their children and between siblings? …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.