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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. It's good to teach them, but … they should also know when to apply it: parents’ views and attitudes towards Fiji's Family Life Education curriculum

    A Family Life Education (FLE) curriculum was introduced in Fiji schools in 2010 in response to concern about increasing teenage pregnancies and young people's vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections and other health and social problems. However, conservative and suspicious parental attitudes towards FLE have been an obstacle. The need for an educational programme for parents to complement the FLE curriculum taught in schools is now urgent. This study examines parents' views on the sex and sexuality component of the FLE curriculum. …

  2. Parent-child communication about sexual and reproductive health in rural Tanzania: Implications for young people's sexual health interventions

    Background: Many programmes on young people and HIV/AIDS prevention have focused on the in-school and channeled sexual and reproductive health messages through schools with limited activities for the young people's families. The assumption has been that parents in African families do not talk about sexual and reproductive health (SRH) with their children. These approach has had limited success because of failure to factor in the young person's family context, and the influence of parents. …

  3. Education status among orphans and non-orphans in communities affected by AIDS in Tanzania and Burkina Faso

    The AIDS pandemic has created an estimated 15 million orphans who may face elevated risk of poor health and social outcomes. This paper compares orphans and non-orphans regarding educational status and delay using data collected in three low-income communities affected by AIDS in Tanzania and Burkina Faso. Orphans were significantly more likely not to attend school than were non-orphans and also to be delayed when in school, though, after controlling for confounders, the risk was borderline and non-significant. …

  4. Working towards better youth sex education in Europe

    This article describes Germany's approach to youth sex education. It starts with a discussion of the fact that sex education is viewed as a national responsibility, then goes into findings of the 2005 youth scientific foundation study on youth sexuality related to sex education at home and in the family; sex education in schools: widespread and well-received; first sexual intercourse; contraception andáuse of the media. The study concludes by saying that a clear relationships exists between sex education at home and positive contraceptive behavior. …

  5. Social cash transfers to support children and families affected by HIV/AIDS

    In response to the critical need of affected children and families, the compelling evidence for their benefits, and the receptive environment on the part of governments and donors, several local and international organizations are piloting cash transfers programmes as a mechanism to mitigate the impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on affected communities in sub- Saharan Africa. Few programmes, however, are conceptualized or implemented within a broader framework of social protection, socioeconomic development or human rights. …

  6. Getting in line: coordinating responses for children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

    Only one in every eight households containing orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in African countries received any support from an external source (UNICEF, 2008). This is a reflection of how governments, both rich and poor, have ignored obligations ratified in conventions to ensure the social protection of vulnerable children (United Nations, 1989). Consequently, a disproportionate proportion of the financial burden of care of vulnerable children is borne by affected families and communities. …

  7. Educators' beliefs about raising lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues in the schools: the experience in Ontario, Canada

    This study investigated the experiences of 132 LGBT and heterosexual teachers and school administrators in Ontario, Canada. Participants completed a survey that asked about their comfort addressing LGBT issues in the school setting, how safe they felt, how active they were, and their perceptions of barriers. There were few differences between the LGBT and heterosexual respondents. However, respondents whose school district had an anti-LGBT harassment policy felt more supported, comfortable, and protected. …

  8. Meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth: a "relational assets" approach

    Drawing primarily on three case studies, this article proposes a framework that those concerned about the welfare of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth can consider when developing, evaluating, or arguing for more effective programming: a relational assets approach. The relational assets approach merges the developmental assets framework outlined by adolescent development researchers and the voice-centered relational work of feminist psychologists. …

  9. Protective factors in the lives of bisexual adolescents in North America

    We compared protective factors among bisexual adolescents with those of heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, and gay or lesbian adolescents. Methods. We analyzed 6 school-based surveys in Minnesota and British Columbia. Sexual orientation was measured by gender of sexual partners, attraction, or self-labeling. Protective factors included family connectedness, school connectedness, and religious involvement. General linear models, conducted separately by gender and adjusted for age, tested differences between orientation groups. …

  10. Committed to caring: Older women and HIV and AIDS in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam

    HIV and AIDS can prove devastating in undermining traditional support structures that sustain many families in Asia, reversing the expectation that parents will be looked after by their adult children as they become older. In reality, as this research report shows, older people, primarily women, are confronted with the task of caring for a sick adult child, coping with their eventual death, and possibly looking after a surviving grandchild.

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