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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The psychological effect of orphanhood in a matured HIV epidemic: an analysis of young people in Mukono, Uganda

    As the HIV pandemic progresses, the number of orphans is expected to rise. Uganda is one of the countries that has been most impacted by the pandemic. A few studies have explored the effects of orphanhood on psychological well-being; however, most of these studies have not explored potential pathways through which orphanhood could affect psychological well-being. Using a school-based sample, this study sought to examine the differences in depressive symptoms and hopelessness between orphans and non-orphans in Mukono District, Uganda. …

  2. Orphan competent communities: a framework for community analysis and action

    Vulnerable children in Africa have traditionally been absorbed and supported by their communities. However, in the context of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and poverty, communities are increasingly stretched, compromising the quality of care available to children affected by AIDS. This calls for an understanding of the processes that best facilitate the capacity of communities to provide good quality care and support. In the interests of furthering debate and practice in this area, we seek to develop an analytical framework that builds upon two inter-linked strands. …

  3. Educators' beliefs about raising lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues in the schools: the experience in Ontario, Canada

    This study investigated the experiences of 132 LGBT and heterosexual teachers and school administrators in Ontario, Canada. Participants completed a survey that asked about their comfort addressing LGBT issues in the school setting, how safe they felt, how active they were, and their perceptions of barriers. There were few differences between the LGBT and heterosexual respondents. However, respondents whose school district had an anti-LGBT harassment policy felt more supported, comfortable, and protected. …

  4. Meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth: a "relational assets" approach

    Drawing primarily on three case studies, this article proposes a framework that those concerned about the welfare of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth can consider when developing, evaluating, or arguing for more effective programming: a relational assets approach. The relational assets approach merges the developmental assets framework outlined by adolescent development researchers and the voice-centered relational work of feminist psychologists. …

  5. Protective factors in the lives of bisexual adolescents in North America

    We compared protective factors among bisexual adolescents with those of heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, and gay or lesbian adolescents. Methods. We analyzed 6 school-based surveys in Minnesota and British Columbia. Sexual orientation was measured by gender of sexual partners, attraction, or self-labeling. Protective factors included family connectedness, school connectedness, and religious involvement. General linear models, conducted separately by gender and adjusted for age, tested differences between orientation groups. …

  6. Committed to caring: Older women and HIV and AIDS in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam

    HIV and AIDS can prove devastating in undermining traditional support structures that sustain many families in Asia, reversing the expectation that parents will be looked after by their adult children as they become older. In reality, as this research report shows, older people, primarily women, are confronted with the task of caring for a sick adult child, coping with their eventual death, and possibly looking after a surviving grandchild.

  7. Reproductive health-seeking by married adolescent girls in Maharashtra, India

    In India, most adolescent girls 15-19 years old are married. A study was conducted in 1995-97 in Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra, India to gain insight into whether and how their reproductive health needs are met, especially for gynaecological problems, family planning and perceived fertility problems. It included a survey among 302 married girls of this age, and in-depth interviews with 74 girls, 37 husbands and 53 mothers-in-law. Girls were treated quickly for illnesses interfering with domestic work and were expected to conceive in the first year of marriage. …

  8. The relative importance of family and education influences on attitudes to family size among Thai single youths

    The objective of this study is to examine family influences, measured by the sibling influences and maternal influences determining family size preference of Thai single adolescents.

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