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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The universal basic education programme and the family life HIV education in Nigeria

    The study assessed the capacity of the Universal Basic Education Programme in Nigeria to effectively implement the Family Life HIV Education Curriculum. Using descriptive statistics, the study has analysed and presented graphs and tables of various national and regional public primary school data from 2004 to 2008 to showcase trends of available capacity in the UBE programme. Pupil enrolment is gradually on the increase in Nigeria and even though the pupil/teacher ratio is inadequate, most of the teachers in the UBE programme are qualified. …

  2. Evaluation of the implementation of Family Life and HIV Education Programme in Nigeria

    Family Life and HIV Education (FLHE) programme was introduced nationwide in Nigeria in 2003. Since then little is known about the patterns of its implementation across the states in the six geo-political zones in Nigeria. This study represents an attempt to fill this lacuna in the FLHE literature in Nigeria. Quantitative data was collected from the Federal Ministry of Education and the State Ministries of Education on all salient aspects of FLHE implementation. …

  3. Risk for coerced sex among female youth in Ghana: Roles of family context, school enrollment and relationship experience

    CONTEXT: A better understanding is needed of the variables that may influence the risk of experiencing coerced sex among adolescent females in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Data were collected from 700 female respondents who were interviewed in 2010 and 2012 waves of a longitudinal study of behavioral risk for HIV infection among youth aged 13–14 or 18–19 and living in two towns in southeastern Ghana. …

  4. AIDS in the family and community: The impact on child health in Malawi

    Pediatric HIV infections jeopardize children’s health and survival. Much less is known about how the experiences of being orphaned, living with chronically ill parents, or living in a severely affected community impact child health. Our study responds by examining which HIV/AIDS-related experiences place children at greatest risk for poor health. …

  5. Parent-child communication about sexual and reproductive health in rural Tanzania: Implications for young people's sexual health interventions

    Background: Many programmes on young people and HIV/AIDS prevention have focused on the in-school and channeled sexual and reproductive health messages through schools with limited activities for the young people's families. The assumption has been that parents in African families do not talk about sexual and reproductive health (SRH) with their children. These approach has had limited success because of failure to factor in the young person's family context, and the influence of parents. …

  6. Predictors of knowledge about HIV/AIDS among young people: Lessons from Botswana

    This study sought to identify factors that can predict knowledge about HIV/AIDS among adolescents in Botswana. The data were collected through a self administered questionnaire from a sample of 1294 students from schools around the capital city of Botswana, Gaborone. The research instrument consisted of 76 items that solicited information on background characteristics of respondents, indicators of family cohesiveness and bonding of children with their parents, indicators of personal adjustment, evidence of sex life, and knowledge about HIV/AIDS. …

  7. Education status among orphans and non-orphans in communities affected by AIDS in Tanzania and Burkina Faso

    The AIDS pandemic has created an estimated 15 million orphans who may face elevated risk of poor health and social outcomes. This paper compares orphans and non-orphans regarding educational status and delay using data collected in three low-income communities affected by AIDS in Tanzania and Burkina Faso. Orphans were significantly more likely not to attend school than were non-orphans and also to be delayed when in school, though, after controlling for confounders, the risk was borderline and non-significant. …

  8. Fostering accurate HIV/AIDS knowledge among unmarried youths in Cameroon: Do family environment and peers matter?

    This report investigates the linkages between family structure, family and peer communication about sexuality and accurate knowledge of transmission and prevention strategies. Data from the Cameroon Family Life and Health Survey, conducted in 2002 were used. Respondents were aged 10 years and over and sampled 765 households from the 75 localities forming the administrative prefecture of Bandjoun. Details questionnaires were used to gather data for the survey and it had a 97% response rate. …

  9. Costs and care: directing resources to children

    While it does not cost a great deal to make a difference in the life of a child living in poverty, that does not mean that they are cheap to care for. To avoid confusion there is a need to distinguish between expenditures on care, marginal costs of care and total cost of care. Expenditures on children are the amounts of money spent on their care. The marginal cost of care is the cost of achieving a specific increase in the level of care. The total cost of care is the cost of providing a given level of care. …

  10. Social cash transfers to support children and families affected by HIV/AIDS

    In response to the critical need of affected children and families, the compelling evidence for their benefits, and the receptive environment on the part of governments and donors, several local and international organizations are piloting cash transfers programmes as a mechanism to mitigate the impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on affected communities in sub- Saharan Africa. Few programmes, however, are conceptualized or implemented within a broader framework of social protection, socioeconomic development or human rights. …

  11. Out of sight, out of mind? Children affected by HIV/AIDS and community responses

    The situation of millions of children whose lives continue to be blighted by the impacts of HIV/AIDS seems still to be 'under the radar' of national and global policymakers (Foster, 2005). Sub-Saharan Africa has two-thirds of all people living with HIV worldwide, but is home to over three-quarters of children orphaned by AIDS and to a staggering 91% of all new pediatric infections. Infants and children are considerably less likely to receive lifesaving antiretroviral treatment (ART) than adults (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, 2009). …

  12. Getting in line: coordinating responses for children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

    Only one in every eight households containing orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in African countries received any support from an external source (UNICEF, 2008). This is a reflection of how governments, both rich and poor, have ignored obligations ratified in conventions to ensure the social protection of vulnerable children (United Nations, 1989). Consequently, a disproportionate proportion of the financial burden of care of vulnerable children is borne by affected families and communities. …

  13. The psychological effect of orphanhood in a matured HIV epidemic: an analysis of young people in Mukono, Uganda

    As the HIV pandemic progresses, the number of orphans is expected to rise. Uganda is one of the countries that has been most impacted by the pandemic. A few studies have explored the effects of orphanhood on psychological well-being; however, most of these studies have not explored potential pathways through which orphanhood could affect psychological well-being. Using a school-based sample, this study sought to examine the differences in depressive symptoms and hopelessness between orphans and non-orphans in Mukono District, Uganda. …

  14. Orphan competent communities: a framework for community analysis and action

    Vulnerable children in Africa have traditionally been absorbed and supported by their communities. However, in the context of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and poverty, communities are increasingly stretched, compromising the quality of care available to children affected by AIDS. This calls for an understanding of the processes that best facilitate the capacity of communities to provide good quality care and support. In the interests of furthering debate and practice in this area, we seek to develop an analytical framework that builds upon two inter-linked strands. …

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