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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. AIDS-related parental loss: does the age when the trauma occurs matter?

    The purpose of this paper is to use data from the Kagera region of northwestern Tanzania to investigate the long run impact of the timing of parental death on the education outcomes. …

  2. Child participation in education initiatives

    This guide from CRS/Zimbabwe addresses child participation in many aspects of programming. Child participation is one of the guiding principles of the convention on the rights of the child and increasing the scope and level of child participation should be an objective for every education or child protection program. This guide presents many useful suggestions for ways to increase child participation, but what is required most of all is a belief in the value of child participation and a commitment to making it happen in a meaningful way. …

  3. Improving communication between parents and adolescents on reproductive health and HIV/AIDS

    L'objectif de cette étude est d'obtenir une meilleure compréhension des interventions conçues spécifiquement pour améliorer la communication entre les parents et les adolescent(e)s en matière de santé de la reproduction. Plus spécifiquement, il s'agit dans cette recherche d'évaluer la fonctionnalité d'un modèle d'intervention destiné à prendre en charge la communication adulte/adolescent(e)s en termes de changements sur: Les connaissances et attitudes des parents et des jeunes sur des questions concernant les adolescent(e)s, notamment la santé la reproduction. …

  4. Sexual and reproductive health of young people: experiences from Technical Cooperation Projects

    The document comprises a selection of 43 project examples representing 41 GTZ projects that are concerned with SRH of young people. Information for each project covers background information, project approach, results and experiences as well as outlook on future plans of the project.

  5. A community-based response on sexual violence against women

    This guide is for field-based refugees workers including UN system, NGOs and governments staff in the health, community services, protection and other related sectors. The booklet presents guidelines in assessing the problem of sexual violence identifying key players in a practical response to the problem, drawing up guidelines on steps to be taken, and roles and responsibilities of actors, setting criteria for selecting team members, organizing training, and evaluating the programme.

  6. Who cares? AIDS Review 2001

    "Who cares?" looks at the levels of HIV/AIDS commitment and care - in the international community, in Africa and inSouth Africa. It askes the question "Who cares?" both in the sense of how we should think about care and commitment, and whether - beyond the rhetoric - we care at all."Who cares?" is largely a reflective document - one that will stir discussion, challenge and response.

  7. The effect of HIV/AIDS on educational attainment

    Using data from Demographic and Health Surveys for eleven countries in sub-Saharan Africa,the authorestimates the effect of local HIV prevalence on individual human capital investment. The authorfinds that the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reduced human capital investment: living in an area with higher HIV prevalence is associated with lower levels of completed schooling and slower progress through school. These results are consistent with a model of human capital investment in which parents and children respond to changes in the expected return to schooling driven by mortality risk.

  8. The Long-run Economic Costs of AIDS: Theory and an Application to South Africa

    Most existing estimates of the macroeconomic costs of AIDS, as measured by the reduction in the growth rate of GDP, are modest. For Africa - the continent where the epidemic has hit the hardest - they range between 0.3 and 1.5 per cent annually. The reason is that these estimates are based on an underlying assumption that the main effect of increased mortality is to relieve pressure on existing land and physical capital so that output per head is little affected. …

  9. The Current and Future Impact of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic on South Africa's Children

    This chapter has three aims. One, to investigate the impacts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic upon the children of South Africa with a focus on health, welfare and education implications. Two, to examine the responses of families, communities, civil society and governments to the crisis confronting the children. Three, to critique those responses and offer alternatives, which may assist in improving the impacts on children.

  10. Protecting the rights of young children affected and infected by HIV/AIDS in Africa: updating strategies and reinforcing existing networks

    The international workshop "Protecting the rights of young children affected and infected by HIV/AIDS in Africa: Updating strategies and reinforcing existing networks" took place in UNESCO Headquarters co-organized by UNESCO and the Early Childhood Development Network for Africa (ECDNA) bringing together representatives of early childhood development NGOs, institutions and UN organizations working in Africa on issues of young children and HIV/AIDS, to identify strategies, lines of action and innovative approaches to respond to the needs of young children faced by the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

  11. Protecting the next generation in sub-saharan Africa: learning from adolescents to prevent HIV and unintended pregnancy

    This report presents key findings from nationally representative surveys conducted in 2004 among 12-19-year-olds in four African countries-Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi and Uganda-with the goal of guiding programs, policies and investments aimed at improving adolescent sexual and reproductive health. It is based on research conducted as part of a multiyear project, called Protecting the Next Generation: Understanding HIV Risk Among Youth. …

  12. Predicting the social consequences of orphanhood in South Africa

    This paper examines and questions the predictions found in the academic and policy literature of social breakdown in Southern Africa in the wake of anticipated high rates of orphanhood caused by the AIDS epidemic. Analysis of the logic underlying these predictions reveals four causal relationships necessary to fulfil such dramatic and apocalyptic predictions:1. High AIDS mortality rates will produce high numbers of orphans.2. These orphans will become children who do not live in appropriate social environments to equip them for adult citizenship.3. …

  13. Orphanhood and schooling in South Africa: trends in the vulnerability of orphans between 1993 and 2005

    Using eleven nationally representative surveys conducted between 1993 and 2005 this paper assesses the extent to which the vulnerability of orphans to poorer educational outcomes has changed over time as the AIDS crisis deepens in South Africa. This paper seeks to establish whether the fear that extended families are no longer effective safety nets may be overstated or whether traditional coping strategies are indeed breaking down. Patterns of care giving for orphans do appear to be shifting over time but these changes are taking place within the extended family safety net. …

  14. Numbers and the AIDS Effect

    Report assesses impact of HIV/AIDS on the education sector, addressing both the current situation and what can be expected: fewer school enrolments, decreased teacher supply, increased health costs straining governments and families. Initial steps for preventive action to combat these hardships are then outlined.

  15. Mitigating the Impact of the Epidemic on Development. Responding to the socio-economic impact of the HIV epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa: Why a systems approach is needed. The HIV Epidemic and the Education Sector in sub-Saharan Africa

    Analyses and responses to the HIV epidemic remain rooted in a mind set which while it was relevant 5 or more years ago may no longer be so. Or at least what is written, said, thought and done about the development implications of the HIV epidemic are no longer sufficient. There is still a lack of clarity about the ways in which development affects the course of the HIV epidemic, such as the role of poverty in transmission of the virus and how families cope with the poverty caused by illness and death. …

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