• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 11 results in 0.017 seconds.

Search results

  1. Accessing the ‘right’ kinds of material and symbolic capital: the role of cash transfers in reducing adolescent school absence and risky behaviour in South Africa

    This article investigates how well South Africa’s Child Support Grant (CSG) responds to the material and psychosocial needs of adolescents, and the resultant effects on schooling and risky behaviour. One driver of schooling decisions is shame related to poverty and the ‘social cost’ of school, where a premium must often be paid for fashionable clothes or accessories. The other driver relates to symbolic and consumptive capital gained through engaging in sexual exchange relationships. The anticipated impacts from the CSG are partial because of these non-material drivers of adolescent choices. …

  2. Structural drivers and social protection: mechanisms of HIV risk and HIV prevention for South African adolescents

    Social protection is high on the HIV-prevention agenda for youth in sub-Saharan Africa. However, questions remain: How do unconditional cash transfers work? What is the effect of augmenting cash provision with social care? And can “cash plus care” social protection reduce risks for adolescents most vulnerable to infection? This study tackles these questions by first identifying mediated pathways to adolescent HIV risks and then examining potential main and moderating effects of social protection in South Africa.

  3. Discussion paper: Cash transfers and HIV prevention

    This discussion paper synthesizes the evidence for the effectiveness of cash transfers for HIV prevention and explores implications and opportunities for advancing research and policy agendas. Much of this evidence centres on girls and young women, who bear significant HIV burdens, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, and often have less control over their sexual choices than do men. Many forms of transfers exist that may contribute to HIV prevention. …

  4. Child-focused state cash transfers and adolescent risk of HIV infection in South Africa: a propensity-score-matched case-control study

    Background: Effective and scalable HIV prevention for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa is needed. Cash transfers can reduce HIV incidence through reducing risk behaviours. However, questions remain about their effectiveness within national poverty-alleviation programmes, and their effects on different behaviours in boys and girls. Methods: In this case-control study, we interviewed South African adolescents (aged 10–18 years) between 2009 and 2012. …

  5. Can money prevent the spread of HIV? A review of cash payments for HIV prevention

    Cash payments to improve health outcomes have been used for many years; however, their use for HIV prevention is new and the impact not yet well understood. We provide a brief background on the rationale behind using cash to improve health outcomes, review current studies completed or underway using cash for prevention of sexual transmission of HIV, and outline some key considerations on the use of cash payments to prevent HIV infections. We searched the literature for studies that implemented cash transfer programs and measured HIV or HIV-related outcomes. …

  6. Social protection and cash transfers to strengthen families affected by HIV and AIDS

    Based on a review of over 300 documents, this monograph examines how social protection can be used to protect children and families affected by HIV and AIDS. It reviews evidence on the impacts of 10 unconditional cash transfer (UCT) programs in southern and East Africa and 10 conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs in Latin America. …

  7. Paying to prevent HIV infection in young women?

    Between a quarter and a third of young women in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with HIV by the time they reach their early 20s. Structural factors such as poor education, poverty, and gender and power inequalities are important determinants of young women’s vulnerability to HIV infection. In The Lancet, Sarah Baird and colleagues report the results of a randomised controlled trial done with adolescent girls in rural Malawi, examining the effects of a cash transfer programme on risk of HIV infection. …

  8. The Impact of a Comprehensive Microfinance Intervention on Depression Levels of AIDS-Orphaned Children in Uganda

    The relationship between poverty and mental health functioning is well documented. Poverty affects not only families’ ability to physically care for children, but also families’ stability, functioning, and psychosocial well-being. In this article, we examine the impact of a comprehensive microfinance intervention, intended to reduce the risk of poverty, on depression among adolescent youth who have lost either one or both parents to AIDS.A child who has been affected by AIDS is more likely to have increased levels of anxiety, depression, and reduced self-esteem. …

  9. Costs and care: directing resources to children

    While it does not cost a great deal to make a difference in the life of a child living in poverty, that does not mean that they are cheap to care for. To avoid confusion there is a need to distinguish between expenditures on care, marginal costs of care and total cost of care. Expenditures on children are the amounts of money spent on their care. The marginal cost of care is the cost of achieving a specific increase in the level of care. The total cost of care is the cost of providing a given level of care. …

  10. UNDP/World Bank/UNAIDS Programme on Mainstreaming AIDS into National Development Plans and Processes: Rounds 1 and 2, a Review of Experiences (2007-2008)

    The purpose of this report is to document the progress made by countries participating in the Mainstreaming Programme in the second and third years of the programme. It is intended as a knowledge-sharing document to facilitate the exchange of practical experiences in HIV mainstreaming, as well as a programming report to facilitate monitoring and future evaluations of the Mainstreaming Programme. …

  11. Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Do they matter for children and young people made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS? Results of a joint UNICEF and World Bank review.

    It is widely agreed that HIV/AIDS should be prominent in the Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) of African countries in light of the challenge the pandemic poses to poverty reduction efforts. A desk review of PRSPs and National Strategic Plans on HIV/AIDS was therefore conducted to assess how HIV/AIDS is being addressed in PRSPs. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.