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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Paying to prevent HIV infection in young women?

    Between a quarter and a third of young women in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with HIV by the time they reach their early 20s. Structural factors such as poor education, poverty, and gender and power inequalities are important determinants of young women’s vulnerability to HIV infection. In The Lancet, Sarah Baird and colleagues report the results of a randomised controlled trial done with adolescent girls in rural Malawi, examining the effects of a cash transfer programme on risk of HIV infection. …

  2. The Impact of a Comprehensive Microfinance Intervention on Depression Levels of AIDS-Orphaned Children in Uganda

    The relationship between poverty and mental health functioning is well documented. Poverty affects not only families’ ability to physically care for children, but also families’ stability, functioning, and psychosocial well-being. In this article, we examine the impact of a comprehensive microfinance intervention, intended to reduce the risk of poverty, on depression among adolescent youth who have lost either one or both parents to AIDS.A child who has been affected by AIDS is more likely to have increased levels of anxiety, depression, and reduced self-esteem. …

  3. Report on supporting care providers to improve lives of children orphaned or made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS

    This report presents the findings of a study on how communities lead the response to orphans and other vulnerable children (OVC) in different regions of Malawi - focusing on the districts of Kasungu and Lilongwe in the central region, Mulanje in the south, and Mzimba in the north. These are districts where Plan Malawi implements OVC care and support interventions. The overall goal of the study was to determine the effectiveness of support being provided by care givers to the well being of OVC made vulnerable by HIV and AIDS. …

  4. Costs and care: directing resources to children

    While it does not cost a great deal to make a difference in the life of a child living in poverty, that does not mean that they are cheap to care for. To avoid confusion there is a need to distinguish between expenditures on care, marginal costs of care and total cost of care. Expenditures on children are the amounts of money spent on their care. The marginal cost of care is the cost of achieving a specific increase in the level of care. The total cost of care is the cost of providing a given level of care. …

  5. Social cash transfers to support children and families affected by HIV/AIDS

    In response to the critical need of affected children and families, the compelling evidence for their benefits, and the receptive environment on the part of governments and donors, several local and international organizations are piloting cash transfers programmes as a mechanism to mitigate the impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on affected communities in sub- Saharan Africa. Few programmes, however, are conceptualized or implemented within a broader framework of social protection, socioeconomic development or human rights. …

  6. The different forms of structures involved in the community response for vulnerable children, and what are they best placed to do

    Initiatives from the local community have been a major part of what has been provided towards the needs of vulnerable children. …

  7. External resources for vulnerable children flowing through community level initiatives: the experiences, concerns and suggestions of initiative leaders and caregivers in Uganda

    Despite significant policy commitments to external resources reaching vulnerable children through communities, little information is available on what happens to these resources particularly as they enter, and flow through, the community. This study explored the related experiences, concerns and suggestions of two critical groups of stakeholders, whose voices are rarely heard: leaders of community initiatives and caregivers. …

  8. Community interventions supporting children affected by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a review to derive evidence-based principles for programming

    Approaching 20 years after the first studies drew attention to the issues faced by children and families affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), evaluation data from programs addressing their circumstances remains limited and clustered, especially when considered in relation to the magnitude of donor spending. A review of evaluation evidence was conducted to derive programming principles for interventions supporting HIV-affected children in sub-Saharan Africa, including care and support, cash transfer and HIV-prevention interventions. …

  9. Orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) programming in Global Fund HIV/AIDS grants in Kenya

    The USAID Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1, conducted a comprehensive desk review to better understand the nature and extent of OVC in Global Fund HIV/AIDS grants and the processes involved. The project then supported a study in Kenya to explore the country situation influencing these processes. Information for the activity came from a review of proposal and grant-related documents available through the Global Fund website and interviews with key informants in Kenya. Kenya was chosen due to its high HIV prevalence rate, OVC burden, and a succession of proposals and grants over time. …

  10. Review of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in HIV/AIDS grants awarded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Rounds 1-7)

    The USAID Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1, conducted this comprehensive desk review, followed by a pilot country study (Pfleiderer and O. Kantai, 2010), to better understand the extent of OVC inclusion in GFATM processes. The desk review that resulted in this report reviewed documents for 261 HIV grants retrieved from the grant database on the Global Fund's web site. It did not include other kinds of Global Fund grants, including health systems strengthening (HSS) grants. …

  11. Innovations in education: the role of the education sector in combating HIV/AIDS

    From 2002-2005 Africare implemented the Community Based Care, Protection and Empowerment (COPE) for Children Affected by AIDS (CABA) project in Mutasa District of Zimbabwe. The goal of the project was to encourage shared responsibility for orphans and vulnerable children by increasing community capacity to respond to the needs of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). …

  12. A costing analysis of selected orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) programs in Botswana

    The number of children under the age of 18 in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) who have lost one or both parents to AIDS has increased dramatically in the last five years. The number of children orphaned by AIDS in SSA is estimated to be around 12 million (UNICEF, 2006). Many more children live with one or more chronically ill or dying parents and or live in poverty stricken and food insecure households. …

  13. Cash transfers: real benefits for children affected by HIV and AIDS

    For children affected by HIV and AIDS, the risks of poverty and loss of livelihood are compounded by the risk of losing family care - their first line of protection. While cash transfers alone are not the solution, they can be an important element of an overall care package for children. Social protection measures - including social transfers (cash, in-kind [food] or vouchers), family support services, and alternative care - can help mitigate the impact of HIV and AIDS by reducing poverty and family separation. …

  14. A cash transfer program reduces HIV infections among adolescent girls

    A large randomized trial in Malawi shows that schoolgirls whose families received monthly cash transfers had a significantly lower HIV infection rate than the control group. The two-year experiment in Zomba, a district in southern Malawi, offered cash to households with schoolgirls aged 13-22 who had never been married. Some of the offers were conditional on regular school attendance, while others were unconditional. Eighteen months after the program began, the HIV prevalence among program beneficiaries was 60% lower than the control group (1.2% vs. 3.0%). …

  15. The short-term impacts of a schooling conditional cash transfer program on the sexual behaviour of young women

    Recent evidence suggests that conditional cash transfer programs for schooling are effective in raising school enrollment and attendance. However, there is also reason to believe that such programs can affect other outcomes, such as the sexual behavior of their young beneficiaries. Zomba Cash Transfer Program is a randomized, ongoing conditional cash transfer intervention targeting young women in Malawi that provides incentives (in the form of school fees and cash transfers) to current schoolgirls and recent dropouts to stay in or return to school. …

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