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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. School based sex education and HIV prevention in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Objectives: School-based sex education is a cornerstone of HIV prevention for adolescents who continue to bear a disproportionally high HIV burden globally. We systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed the existing evidence for schoolbased sex education interventions in low- and middle-income countries to determine the efficacy of these interventions in changing HIV-related knowledge and risk behaviors. Methods: We searched five electronic databases, PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Sociological Abstracts, for eligible articles. …

  2. An HIV/AIDS knowledge scale for adolescents: item response theory analyses based on data from a study in South Africa and Tanzania

    A 14-item human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome knowledge scale was used among school students in 80 schools in 3 sites in Sub-Saharan Africa (Cape Town and Mankweng, South Africa, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania). For each item, an incorrect or don't know response was coded as 0 and correct response as 1. Exploratory factor analyses based on polychoric correlations showed two separate factors for all sites. …

  3. Long-Term Biological and Behavioural Impact of an Adolescent Sexual Health Intervention in Tanzania: Follow-up Survey of the Community-Based MEMA kwa Vijana Trial

    The ability of specific behaviour-change interventions to reduce HIV infection in young people remains questionable. Since January 1999, an adolescent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) intervention has been implemented in ten randomly chosen intervention communities in rural Tanzania, within a community randomised trial (see below; NCT00248469). The intervention consisted of teacher-led, peer-assisted in-school education, youth-friendly health services, community activities, and youth condom promotion and distribution. …

  4. Assessment life-skills based curriculum in Lao PDR

    According to the 2010 UNGASS Country Progress Report, Lao PDR is the only country in the Greater Mekong Region with a continuing low HIV prevalence. However, the report makes it clear that the country is “continuously vulnerable to an expanding epidemic” and that a key reason for this is increasing high-risk behaviour among the youth, in particular the use of drugs and alcohol. …

  5. Life skills education in the context of HIV and AIDS

    This piece explores the role of life-skills education (LSE) in the context of HIV and AIDS, in particular in relation to its potential for contributing towards HIV prevention efforts amongst young people. LSE within the context of HIV and AIDS can occur both in school and in non-schools settings; target groups for such education include children, youth and adults. Groups particularly at risk of HIV-acquisition, include sex workers, intravenous drug users and men-who-have-sex-with-men. …

  6. Gender and Sexuality/HIV Education

    Sex/HIV education curricula have disparate effects for females and males. Review of 59 rigorous sex ed evaluations from the U.S. and developing countries. After omitting single sex programs, programs with no effect, and programs that changed only knowledge, 38 remained (25 U.S. and 13 developing country). A third of these failed to disaggregate results by gender, leaving 25. This article looks at why this is the case and how gender affects SRH outcomes.

  7. Condom Use Increases Among Namibian Youths Following HIV Training

    Namibian adolescents who received an HIV training curriculum experienced significant changes in attitudes, knowledge, intentions and behaviors concerning sexual activity and HIV. Adolescents who received training were more likely than their peers to know how pregnancy occurs and how to use a condom correctly. They also were more likely to believe that they could be intimate with a partner without having sex and that they could have a girlfriend or boyfriend for a long time without having sex. …

  8. A novel economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among school-going AIDS orphans in rural Uganda

    This study tested an economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among AIDS-orphaned adolescents. Adolescents (n = 96) were randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for orphans in Uganda. All adolescents in the study received usual care for AIDS orphans in Uganda, which included peer counseling, health education, and scholastic materials. In addition, experimental adolescents received a family economic intervention, which included a Child/Youth Development Account (CDA) and six 2-hour classes on career planning, career goals, microfinance, and financial well-being. …

  9. HIV prevention for South African youth: which interventions work? A systematic review of current evidence

    South Africa's HIV prevalence among 15-24 year olds is one of the highest in the world. This systematic review looks at the evidence for youth HIV prevention in the country since 2000 and critically assesses interventions across four domains: study design and outcomes; intervention design; thematic focus and HIV causal pathways; and intervention delivery. Eight interventions were included in the review, all similar regarding content and objectives, but with variouis thematic foci, causal pathways, theoretical bases, delivery methods, intensity and duration. …

  10. Working towards better youth sex education in Europe

    This article describes Germany's approach to youth sex education. It starts with a discussion of the fact that sex education is viewed as a national responsibility, then goes into findings of the 2005 youth scientific foundation study on youth sexuality related to sex education at home and in the family; sex education in schools: widespread and well-received; first sexual intercourse; contraception andáuse of the media. The study concludes by saying that a clear relationships exists between sex education at home and positive contraceptive behavior. …

  11. Does Peer Education Work in Europe?

    This publication deals with current sexual and reproductive health issues. In this issue, a range of themes related to peer education are tackled, including its theoretical foundations and models; its role in battling STIs/HIV/AIDS in Denmark and the Russian Federation; theatre as a peer-led approach in central and eastern Europe; Hungary's approach to sex education; and the role of medical students in providing peer education.

  12. Changes in HIV/AIDS education, knowledge and attitudes among Scottish 15-16 year olds, 1990-1994: findings from the WHO Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study (HBSC)

    School health education programs are needed to curb the high prevalence of STIs and unintended pregnancies among adolescents in the UK. Accurate data on knowledge levels and sexual education needs are necessary to design effective programs. This paper discusses results of the WHO: Health Behaviours of School-aged Children Study on changes in knowledge, attitudes and perceived educational needs among Scottish school-going children between 1990 and 1994. …

  13. Increased sexual abstinence among in-school adolescents as a result of school health education in Soroti district, Uganda

    A health education program conducted in primary schools in Soroti district, Uganda promoted increased access to information, better peer interactions and better quality of the health education system. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among students in their final year of primary school (average age 14 years) at baseline and two years after introduction of the intervention. The percentage of sexually active students decreased from 42.9% (123 out of 287) to 11.1% (31 out of 280) in the intervention arm, while no changes were observed in the control arm. …

  14. HIV Prevention Education and HIV-Related Policies in Secondary Schools -- Selected Sites, United States, 2006

    People engaging in risky behavior are at risk for contracting HIV infection. Health education programs in schools can reduce the prevalence of such behaviors among students. School policies on HIV can also protect the rights of HIV-infected students and staff and reduce the odds of transmission to others. This report analyzed School Health Profiles from 2006 across 36 states and 13 urban school districts in the U.S. …

  15. HIV prevention through drugs and sex education in junior high schools in Bandung West Java: the teachers' perspective

    The aim of this report was to identify teachers' views on knowledge, skills and curriculum content needs; attitudes; self-efficacy; and beliefs regarding teaching reproductive health and drug education in their junior high schools, in order to identify whether such programs should be implemented. From February through April 2009, 133 teachers completed a survey documenting socio demographics, behavioral intention, perceived behavior control, content knowledge, school climate, reproductive health (RH) knowledge and school drug education (DE). …

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