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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Guidelines for supporting sexual and gender diversity in schools. Sexuality discrimination and homophobic bullying

    It is a fundamental right of every child and young person to feel safe in their school environment. Western Australian schools pride themselves on being safe and effective learning environments that cater for the diverse needs of all students, including those who are (LGBTI) lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and other sexuality, sex and gender diverse people. Recognising LGBTI students and staff as an everyday part of the social mix of the school community is important in responding appropriately to their needs. …

  2. Breaking a spell of silence: the Tasmanian evaluation of the 2006 Pride and Prejudice program

    An evaluation of the Pride & Prejudice program, which ran in three Tasmanian schools in 2006, suggests that students who completed the program had more positive attitudes towards gay men and lesbians. This finding parallels an earlier evaluation of the same anti-homophobia program undertaken in Victoria. The evaluation leads to a discussion about the deeper and often hidden purposes of schooling, and about the discursive formations of heteronormativity, which provide a heterosexist basis for ‘curriculum’. …

  3. Stand Out: against homophobia in schools

    Stand Out is the work of Australian students who are making a change in their schools, with their information on what you can do to challenge homophobia in yours.

  4. Special issue: anti-homophobia teacher education

    This special issue focuses on one particular field of social justice; that is, anti-homophobia education. The various papers included explore how antihomophobia education is being approached in some teacher education programs and in the broader field of education in regions of Australia and Canada. It provides a glimpse of how teacher educators and educators more generally are trying to counteract, disrupt and challenge the homophobia and heterosexism that prevail in educational contexts and in broader communities. …

  5. Safer school formals: a guide

    The end of the school year is a stressful and exciting time for senior students. It is a time full of pressing decisions, preparations for the future, exams and of course planning for one of the biggest nights in the school calendar, the school formal/prom/deb. For same sex attracted (SSA) and gender questioning (GQ) students participating in end-of-year festivities may not always carry the same excitement. While many schools pride themselves on their inclusive and anti-discrimination policies, the rights of SSAGQ students can often be overlooked. …

  6. Stand out against homophobia in schools

    Stand Out: Against Homophobia in Schools is a package of resources for students to make an impact on homophobia in schools. It includes a 32 page guide booklet, two new posters, stickers and a video. Stand Out has been created by a team of young people from Minus18 and Safe Schools Coalition Victoria - young people who are determined to stand out and make a change.The word homophobia is used to describe a whole range of irrational negative feelings or behaviour towards anyone who is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or who is attracted to the same sex. …

  7. How to support sexual diversity in schools: a checklist

    Attitudes towards sexual diversity in Australia have undergone remarkable change in the last 10 years. Gay men and lesbians experience greater social acceptance and less discrimination than in the past. More public identities have been willing to be open about their sexuality. Despite these changes, a young person who is same sex attracted, or who thinks they might be, cannot be sure of their reception - at home or at school. Research tells us that 60% of same-sex attracted young people experience abuse, and that the greatest amount of the abuse (74%) occurs at schools. …

  8. Supporting sexual diversity in schools: a guide

    Homophobic bullying and assumptions of heterosexuality mean that many same sex attracted or gender questioning (SSAGQ) students feel frightened or less confident to attend school and/or feel unable to get support because it will mean they have to come out. This means that SSAGQ students experience interrupted access to the full range of school programs and activities, at times resulting in an inability to complete their studies or perform to their academic potential. …

  9. Establishing an association between rural youth suicide and same-sex attraction

    Recent research into same-sex attracted youth (SSAY) suicide and rural youth suicide suggests there may be an association between the two. A literature review explores this proposal. While contributing issues to rural SSAY suicide, such as homophobia, isolation, avaibility of information, and acknowledgement of issues are discussed, little hard evidence is found to support the rural and SSAY suicide connection. Further and on-going research is recommended into this under-represented topic.

  10. Safety in our schools: strategies for responding to homophobia

    Australian research about young people has found that schools can be very unsafe for students who are, or perceived to be, gay, lesbian, or bisexual. Research has also found that many teachers are reluctant to address issues to do with homosexuality, especially in relation to students. Like the rest of the community, school staff have a range of beliefs and concerns about homosexuality. Unlike the rest of the community, teachers work with many young people from diverse backgrounds representing different values, religious beliefs, and family expectations. …

  11. Teaching diversities: same sex attracted young people, CALD communities, and arts-based community education

    The teaching diversities project has been funded by Victoria University and represents a collaboration with the Centre for Multicultural Youth in recognition of the particular needs (and risks) of doubly-marginalised young people who identify as both same sex-attracted, and those from multicultural backgrounds. The vulnerability of these young people hinges on the intersection of homophobia in some cultural communities and also racism within some lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) communities. …

  12. Writing themselves in 3. The third national study on the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people

    Writing Themselves In 3 (WTi3) is the third national study of the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people (SSAGQ). The Writing Themselves In reports serve several functions beyond being a strong indicator of the sexual health and wellbeing of SSAGQ young people. They are an indicator of levels of homophobia in Australian schools and other places where young people congregate, and they reveal the effectiveness of the many interventions that aim to make Australia a safer and more inclusive place for these young people. …

  13. Writing themselves in again: 6 years on. The 2nd national report on the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people in Australia

    Writing Themselves In Again - 6 years on: the 2nd national report on the sexuality, health and well-being of same sex attracted young Australians is the follow up report to a similar study conducted in 1998. The aim of the report is to find out whether the many changes in the community have improved the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people (SSAY). In particular the project aimed to: 1. Document the levels of homophobia and discrimination facing SSAY today; 2. Document the impact of homophobia on young people themselves; 3. …

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