• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 8 results in 0.023 seconds.

Search results

  1. Gender tales from Africa: voices of children and women against discrimination

    The collection of these tales aims to provide relevant and experiential case studies for participants in gender-related courses in schools, colleges and universities, as well as in non-formal education settings. Most of the tales were written and tested by facilitators and learners during the annual 'Gender and Development in Southern Africa' course between 1998 and 2000. Several were also tested in a UNICEF workshop on 'Gender, Sexuality and HIV/ AIDS in Education', which was held in Malawi in July 2001. …

  2. Sexual exploitation of adolescent girls in Uganda. The drivers, consequences and responses to the ‘sugar daddy’ phenomenon

    Cross-generational sex and transactional sexual relations are of significant public concern in Uganda where 11.8% of girls across the country are affected. The phenomenon can be linked to immediate and life-long consequences for both girls and boys who are affected. This study looks closely at the extent to which income poverty relates to social pressures to commit or not commit a certain behavior, which is found to contribute to this particular violation of child rights.

  3. Using participatory research and action to address the HIV-related vulnerabilities of adolescent girls in Tanzania

    Globally, girls and young women are more likely to be HIV positive than their male peers, due in large part to an array of gender inequalities that negatively impact their mental and physical well being. Protecting girls from this multi-dimensional risk requires first understanding how the girls experience vulnerability in their daily lives and developing solutions that are actionable within the community context. …

  4. HIV prevention for South African youth: which interventions work? A systematic review of current evidence

    South Africa's HIV prevalence among 15-24 year olds is one of the highest in the world. This systematic review looks at the evidence for youth HIV prevention in the country since 2000 and critically assesses interventions across four domains: study design and outcomes; intervention design; thematic focus and HIV causal pathways; and intervention delivery. Eight interventions were included in the review, all similar regarding content and objectives, but with variouis thematic foci, causal pathways, theoretical bases, delivery methods, intensity and duration. …

  5. The gendered impact of HIV/AIDS on education in South Africa and Swaziland: Save the Children's experiences

    Children are dropping out of school in large numbers in communities affected by HIV/AIDS, despite policies and programmes that are designed to support their continued attendance. Research carried out by Save the Children in South Africa and Swaziland concludes that factors influencing drop-out are poverty related, exacerbated by HIV/AIDS. These factors also play out in gendered ways. …

  6. Walking the talk: putting women's rights at the heart of the HIV and AIDS response

    Using research from 13 countries, this report demonstrates that gender inequalities and the persistent and systematic violation of their rights are leaving women and girls disproportionately vulnerable to HIV and AIDS. Poverty and limited access to education and information, discriminatory laws and ingrained gender inequalities all deny women and girls their rights. …

  7. Socioeconomic disadvantage and unsafe sexual behaviors among young women and men in South Africa

    Recent evidence suggests that the burden of new HIV infections in developing countries is concentrated among young people and females. Even with knowledge of how to protect oneself from infection, such information may not always be usable in daily situations of economic and social disadvantage that characterize the lives of many young people and women in poor countries. …

  8. Gender Inequalities in primary Schooling: The roles of poverty and adverse cultural practice

    This paper suggests a simple model for the relationships between poverty, schooling and gender inequality. It argues that poverty at both national and household levels is associated with an under-enrolment of school age children, but that the gendered outcomes of such under enrolment are the product of cultural practice, rather than poverty per se. Using detailed case study material from two African countries, evidence is presented to show the variety and extent of adverse cultural practice which impede the attendance and performance of girls at school, relative to boys. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.