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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Empower young women and adolescent girls: fast-track the end of the AIDS epidemic in Africa

    The purpose of this report is to guide regional and global advocacy and inform political dialogue over the coming year, including in the contexts of the African Union Agenda 2063 and the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. …

  2. Sexual and reproductive health and rights – the key to gender equality and women’s empowerment

    This report is intended for advocates and decision makers, to help them champion sexual and reproductive health and rights as central to advancing the empowerment of girls and women and to achieving gender equality. This report examines the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality. It explores the different pathways of empowerment that girls and women experience, and analyzes how these pathways are affected by sexual and reproductive health and rights. …

  3. Gender-responsive HIV programming for women and girls

    This guidance note is intended to guide countries on how to include a gender perspective and promote equality and human rights for women and girls in their national HIV responses, drawing upon the latest technical developments, guidelines and investment approaches. The inclusion of a gender perspective for women and girls into national HIV responses is important because they continue to be profoundly affected by HIV. As such, addressing their needs is a prerequisite to effectively responding to the epidemic. …

  4. Integrating gender and gender-based violence into HIV programs

    The vision of the Mozambique President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Gender-Based Violence Initiative (GBVI) is to reduce incidence of gender-based violence (GBV) and to create a social and institutional environment that protects women and girls and offers services of protection and help to survivors. A joint U.S. Government, Government of Mozambique, and civil society team led and developed the GBVI plan, which was informed by a wide stakeholder consultation held in August 2010. …

  5. The cost and cost-effectiveness of gender-responsive interventions for HIV: a systematic review

    Introduction: Harmful gender norms and inequalities, including gender-based violence, are important structural barriers to effective HIV programming. We assess current evidence on what forms of gender-responsive intervention may enhance the effectiveness of basic HIV programmes and be cost-effective. Methods: Effective intervention models were identified from an existing evidence review (“what works for women”). Based on this, we conducted a systematic review of published and grey literature on the costs and cost-effectiveness of each intervention identified. …

  6. Strengthening the enabling environment for women and girls: what is the evidence in social and structural approaches in the HIV response?

    There is growing interest in expanding public health approaches that address social and structural drivers that affect the environment in which behaviour occurs. Half of those living with HIV infection are women. The sociocultural and political environment in which women live can enable or inhibit their ability to protect themselves from acquiring HIV. …

  7. Preventing sexual violence and HIV in children

    BACKGROUND: Evidence linking violence against women and HIV has grown, including on the cycle of violence and the links between violence against children and women. To create an effective response to the HIV epidemic, it is key to prevent sexual violence against children and intimate partner violence (IPV) against adolescent girls. …

  8. Gender inequality and HIV transmission: a global analysis

    Introduction: The HIV pandemic disproportionately impacts young women. Worldwide, young women aged 15–24 are infected with HIV at rates twice that of young men, and young women alone account for nearly a quarter of all new HIV infections. The incommensurate HIV incidence in young – often poor – women underscores how social and economic inequalities shape the HIV epidemic. Confluent social forces, including political and gender violence, poverty, racism, and sexism impede equal access to therapies and effective care, but most of all constrain the agency of women. …

  9. Protocolo de atención integral en salud sexual y reproductiva a mujeres viviendo con VIH. Orientaciones complementarias para el programa nacional de salud de la mujer

    Para el Ministerio de Salud es de gran relevancia presentar y poner a disposición de la Red Asistencial Pública, este Protocolo de Atención Integral en Salud Sexual y Reproductiva para Mujeres Viviendo con VIH, como una contribución hacia el mejoramiento de su calidad de vida, bajo los principios del enfoque de ética, derechos, equidad y no discriminación. …

  10. If I buy the Kellogg’s then he should [buy] the milk: young women’s perspectives on relationship dynamics, gender power and HIV risk in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Ideals of masculinity and femininity may limit South African women's decision making power in relationships and increase their risk of HIV infection. The authors conducted 30 in-depth interviews with 18-24-year-old women in inner-city Johannesburg with the aim of understanding young women's expectations of intimate relationships with men, their perceptions of gender and power and how this influences HIV risk. …

  11. Women hold up half the sky - and half the burden of the HIV epidemic

    The HIV burden on women is dramatically higher in some regions, certain age groups and among marginalized groups, such as female sex workers. Women’s vulnerability to HIV is exacerbated by gender inequality and domestic violence. The global effort towards elimination of paediatric HIV and keeping mothers alive deserves applause. However, the needs of women go beyond their child-bearing age or potentials and/or reproductive desires and must be recognized in the global HIV agenda. In particular, more female-controlled prevention tools are urgently required to allow women to protect themselves.

  12. They arrested me for loving a schoolgirl: ethnography, HIV, and a feminist assessment of the age of consent law as a gender-based structural intervention in Uganda

    In 1990 women's rights activists in Uganda successfully lobbied to amend the Defilement Law, raising the age of sexual consent for adolescent females from fourteen to eighteen years old and increasing the maximum sentence to death by hanging. The amendment can be considered a macro-level intervention designed to address the social and health inequalities affecting young women and girls, particularly their disproportionately high rate of HIV as compared to their male counterparts. …

  13. Women and HIV in Viet Nam: Meeting the Needs. Report summary

    This report introduces current knowledge on the particular situation that Vietnamese women face with regard to HIV. Women are a critical population within the epidemic, not only in terms of sheer numbers, but as this report emphasizes, in terms of the disproportionate toll that HIV can take on their lives. Even as the rate of infection begins to stabilize among high-risk men, transmission continues from these men to their wives and regular partners. …

  14. The establishment of a National Coalition on Women, Girls and AIDS

    The Network of Non-Governmental Organizations of Trinidad and Tobago for the Advancement of Women (The Network) has been contracted by the United Nations in Trinidad and Tobago to execute this Project: “Formation of a National Coalition on Women and Girls and AIDS. The project entails: a mapping of organizations working on women, girls and AIDS in Trinidad and Tobago; and the development of a structure and three year work plan for the coalition in consultation with national partners. …

  15. Improving the HIV response for women in Latin America: barriers to integrated advocacy for sexual and reproductive health and rights

    Civil society plays an important health governance role by influencing international sexual, reproductive health and HIV agendas as expressed in international conferences; monitoring and evaluating implementation; and holding governments accountable for their commitments. Integration of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services to achieve the health-related MDGs would seem to be a strategic joint advocacy agenda for the women's sexual and reproductive health movement and HIV activists, particularly women living with HIV. …

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