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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Sexual health media resource pack

    The Sexual Health Strategy identifies the media as a means to communicate on sexual health in an effective and responsible way. Evidence shows that the media is a useful means to provide information to the general public. The type of media used will depend on the identified target audience. Unbalanced or inaccurate media messages can lead to pressures and confusion over the realities of sex and sexuality particularly for young people. Hence we cannot stop emphasizing the need and importance of the media to be trained on where to seek reliable sources of information and advice. …

  2. Creating a PSHE education policy for your school

    This paper will help you write your school’s PSHE education policy. The best policies are produced collaboratively by the people who will be affected by them and should be consulted on widely. This consultation should include pupils themselves where appropriate. The completed policy will serve a number of purposes: - To people unfamiliar with the school, it publicly defines ‘what we believe and how we do things here’; - For people working in the school it offers a clear framework for teaching, protocols to follow, and a ‘tool’ that helps to shape decision-making.

  3. UNAIDS guidance for partnerships with civil society, including people living with HIV and key populations

    This document provides guidance on how The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), its Cosponsors and Secretariat (working at national, regional and global levels) should strengthen and operationalize meaningful and respectful partnership work with civil society. It should enable the UN to deliver the targets and elimination commitments agreed in the 2011 Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS. …

  4. Initial teacher training: developing an inclusive programme of study

    Good initial teacher training (ITT) equips teachers with the information, resources and tools they need to help children and young people enjoy learning and fulfil their potential. But finding the time to teach trainees about the range of issues they might experience during their teaching career can be difficult. Schools have a legal duty to prevent and tackle all forms of bullying, including homophobic bullying. …

  5. Safe for all: a best practice guide to prevent homophobic bullying in secondary schools

    Bullying related to sexual orientation is now recognised as a serious issue with which schools should engage. This guide is intended for governors, school staff or other professionals who want to prevent or challenge homophobic bullying in secondary schools. Evidence increasingly suggests that attention to the physical and emotional well-being of pupils (including helping those who are bullied or who bully) can and does lead to more effective schools and raised academic attainment. …

  6. Rights Against INtolerance Building an Open-minded World, RAINBOW Toolkit

    The project connects EU gay and lesbian associations, schools, media professionals promoting the rights of children and young people to their sexual identity and orientation and who fight against homophobia, in order to A) study stereotypes and B) challenge them.

  7. Pupil's guide to surviving anti-gay harassment and physical or sexual assault

    This document provides advice and guidance to pupils for dealing with anti-gay harassment in schools.

  8. Head teacher's guide to handling anti-gay harassment: UK specific version

    This guide provides advice and tips for head teachers in handling anti-gay harassment in schools.

  9. Promoting equal opportunities in education, project two: guidance on dealing with homophobic incidents

    The objectives of the research are: - To identify current policy in relation to homophobic incidents in Scottish schools, both from the perspectives of EAs and school staff; - To identify current practice in dealing with homophobic incidents in Scottish schools, both from the perspectives of EAs and school staff; - To determine awareness levels of homophobic incidents amongst EAs and school staff; - To determine confidence levels amongst school staff in dealing with homophobic incidents; - To determine confidence levels amongst school staff in discussing antihomophobia and LGBT issues with pup …

  10. Transphobic bullying: could you deal with it in your school? Guidance on combating transphobic bullying in schools. Crime reduction toolkit for the home office website

    During the past decade, transgender issues have become a major component of diversity programmes throughout the public service sector. Their present prominence results from continuing rapid growth in the number of transgender people who reveal their gender variance, and substantial strengthening in the laws that support and protect them. Despise the enactment of supportive legislation, transgender people continue to experience widespread discriminiation in the educational environment, in the workplace and society generally. …

  11. Guidance for schools on preventing and responding to sexist, sexual and transphobic bullying. Safe to learn: embedding anti-bullying work in schools, quick guide

    Every child in every school has the right to learn free from the fear of bullying, whatever form that bullying may take. Everyone involved in a child's education needs to work together to ensure this is the case. Sexist, sexual and transphobic bullying occurs when a pupil (or group), usually repeatedly, harms another pupil or intentionally makes them unhappy because of their sex or because they may not be perceived to conform to normal gender roles. The root cause of sexist and sexual bullying is gender inequality.

  12. The education equality curriculum guide: supporting teachers in tackling homophobia in school

    This guide focuses predominantly on issues of sexual orientation and homophobia. These lessons are designed for use at Key Stage 3. They can be adapted and used to suit different year groups and abilities. Some lessons already provide ideas and resources for differentiation within the class. The majority of the lessons focus on sexual orientation or an investigation of homophobia; the same activities can be adapted and applied to other causes such as sectarianism/racism. There are also lessons however, which bring in LGBT issues and people as one of many other issues. …

  13. Toolkit for teachers dealing with homophobia and homophobic bullying in Scottish schools

    This toolkit has been developed as one of a number of equality projects covering a range of issues. It follows research to identify policy, practice, awareness and confidence around dealing with homophobic incidents. The research suggested that in relation to bullying and discrimination, the issue of sexual orientation is less embedded compared to other equality strands such as gender, disability and race, and teachers were less confident in dealing consistently and effectively with homophobia. …

  14. Guidelines for an LGBTQ inclusive education

    In Europe, school is where young lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer people face the most discrimination. When IGLYO, in partnership with ILGA-Europe, conducted a European study in 2006, as many as 61% of the young LGBT respondents reported negative personal experiences in schools: social exclusion, bullying, harassment, verbal and physical aggressions, and curriculum-based discrimination on the basis of their perceived gender identity and/or sexual orientation. The present Guidelines are not the ultimate guide to LGBTQ-friendly schools and universities. …

  15. Homophobic bullying. Safe to learn: embedding anti-bullying work in schools

    Every child in every school has the right to learn free from the fear of bullying, whatever form that bullying may take. Everyone involved in a child's education needs to work together to ensure that this is the case. Schools need to take an active approach to tackling all forms of bullying, including homophobic bullying. Schools should be taking action to prevent bullying behaviour, as well as responding to incidents when they occur. A preventative approach to bullying means that schools safeguard thewelfare of their pupils. …

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