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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. HIV and AIDS: a deep human concern. A compilation of lectures and presentations from the annual Irish Aid professor Father Michael Kelly lecture series 2006-2015

    Originally hailing from Tullamore, Ireland, Professor Father Michael Kelly has spent more than 50 years living and working in Zambia, where he is now a citizen. Since 2006, the Irish Aid Professor Fr. Michael Kelly Lecture on HIV and AIDS has been held annually to honour his lifetime contributions to tackling HIV and AIDS, and to reducing their associated stigma, discrimination, and impacts on human rights. …

  2. Kenya: Healthy Outcomes through Prevention Education (HOPE). Final evaluation

    In Kenya, high poverty, insecurity, poor health outcomes, substance abuse and low levels of education make young people, especially girls, vulnerable to a variety of risks such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), other Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Diseases (STDs), and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV). …

  3. Engaging school personnel in making schools safe for girls in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique

    Girls are vulnerable to HIV in part because the social systems in which they live have failed to protect them. This study evaluates a program aimed at making schools safe for girl learners in order to reduce girls’ vulnerability to HIV in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique. In addition to an extensive process evaluation with school personnel program participants, program facilitators, and community members, a cross-sectional post-intervention survey was conducted among adolescent girls in the three countries. The total sample size was 1249 adolescent girls (ages 11–18). …

  4. Preparing teachers to deliver gender-focused sexuality/HIV education: a case study from Nigeria

    Evidence shows that a focus on gender and power in sexuality/HIV education increases the likelihood of achieving positive sexual health outcomes, and international agencies have called for a shift to a gender-focused approach. However, questions remain about the implementation of such programmes, including how best to prepare teachers to deliver such curricula. In the development of the national school-based HIV prevention curriculum in Nigeria, several state governments partnered with feminist (or like-minded) non-governmental organisations to collaborate on teacher training. …

  5. Population Brief

    Articles from this issue : Making sexuality and HIV education programs more effective | Reducing adolescent girls’ vulnerability to sexual violence in sub-Saharan Africa | Developing a highly acceptable contraceptive vaginal ring | Creating a database of HIV prevention clinical trial terminology and translations.

  6. Rising school enrollment and declining HIV and pregnancy risk among adolescents in Rakai district, Uganda, 1994–2013

    Background: Poverty, family stability, and social policies influence the ability of adolescents to attend school. Likewise, being enrolled in school may shape an adolescent’s risk for HIV and pregnancy. We identified trends in school enrollment, factors predicting school enrollment (antecedents), and health risks associated with staying in or leaving school (consequences). Methods: Data from the Rakai Community Cohort Study (RCCS) were examined for adolescents 15–19 years (n = 21,735 person-rounds) from 1994 to 2013. …

  7. Draft Department of Basic Education national policy on HIV, STIs and TB

    The Department of Basic Education HIV, STIs and TB Policy applies to all learners, educators, school support staff and officials in the Basic Education Sector at all public and independent primary and secondary schools in the Republic of South Africa. …

  8. Tuko Pamoja: A guide for peer educators

    This guide was developed by PATH as part of the Kenya Adolescent Reproductive Health Project (KARHP) Tuko Pamoja ("We are together") series. It is intended to be used by peer educators facilitating discussion groups with in- and out-of-school youth. The guide will help peer educators share information and lead discussions with their peers on addressing physical and emotional changes during adolescence, staying healthy, planning for the future, making good decisions, and preventing pregnancy and HIV and AIDS. …

  9. Integrating gender and gender-based violence into HIV programs

    The vision of the Mozambique President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Gender-Based Violence Initiative (GBVI) is to reduce incidence of gender-based violence (GBV) and to create a social and institutional environment that protects women and girls and offers services of protection and help to survivors. A joint U.S. Government, Government of Mozambique, and civil society team led and developed the GBVI plan, which was informed by a wide stakeholder consultation held in August 2010. …

  10. Inviting Backchat: How schools and communities in Ghana, Swaziland and Kenya support children to contextualise knowledge and create agency through sexuality education

    Education about sex, relationships and HIV and AIDS in African contexts is riddled with socio-cultural complexity. In this paper the authors argue that in extreme contexts education can lead change further by developing young people as significant actors in their own lives and in the lives of the community by bringing about change in attitudes in the community, as well as practices in schools. …

  11. Emma says: A case study of the use of comics for health education among women in the AIDS heartland

    The purpose of this paper is to examine one mass media AIDS education project, the Emma Says comic series. Created by an international health research organization based in the USA, the series was designed to educate women in rural Africa about the need to protect themselves from AIDS. The Emma Says series aimed to deliver powerful messages about AIDS in an easy-to-understand format using the caricature of an African woman working as a health educator in her community. …

  12. Learning about HIV/AIDS in schools: does a gender-equality approach make a difference?

    Is HIV education based on the principles of gender equality possible in practice? If so, can it make a difference to gender relations in a society? This chapter considers these questions through reflection on two gender-based HIV education interventions in South Africa and Mozambique, which took place between 2001 and 2003.

  13. Talk what others think you can’t talk: HIV/AIDS clubs as peer education in Ugandan schools

    In this article, we make the case that HIV/AIDS clubs in Ugandan schools provide valuable information to students who may not have easy access to health services. As one club motto suggests, the clubs ‘talk what others think you can’t talk’. The innovative peer education methods, which include drama, popular culture and community outreach all have great appeal to youth, and provide unique opportunities for female students to raise gender issues and develop leadership skills. …

  14. Gender, sex and HIV: How to adress issues that no-one want to hear about

    This paper discusses the limitations of conventional Information, Education and Communication (IEC) approaches to HIV prevention and describes Stepping Stones, one approach which 1) is more holistic in recognising the location of HIV in a broader sexual and reproductive health (SRH) context; 2) emphasises the importance of a gendered perspective throughout; and 3) works on the basis that, with good facilitation, ordinary community members are those most able to develop the best solutions for their own sexual health needs.

  15. Knowledge, Behaviour, Perceptions and Attitudes of University of Ghana Students towards HIV/AIDS: What does Behavioural Surveillance Survey Tell us?

    This study assesses knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in respect of risk of HIV infection of students through behavioral surveillance survey. The study used the systematic sampling approach to select 375 students. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted to solicit information from respondents. The study found out that the students engaged in pre-marital sex, although this was more common among the male than female students. Students did not use condoms consistently and were not likely to use condoms when the relationship was considered as stable because of trust. …

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