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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. "It's not normal": sexual exploitation, harassment and abuse in secondary schools in Senegal

    “It’s not normal” documents how female students are exposed to sexual exploitation, harassment, and abuse in middle and upper secondary schools. Based on interviews and focus group discussions with more than 160 girls and young women, the report documents cases of teachers who abuse their position of authority by sexually harassing girls and engage in sexual relations with them, promising students money, good grades, food, or items such as mobile phones and new clothes. …

  2. Educating girls: Creating a foundation for positive sexual and reproductive health behaviors

    Investments that promote keeping girls in school, particularly in secondary school, have far-reaching and long-term health and development benefits for individuals, families, and communities. The purpose of this brief is to describe the relationship of girls’ education on family planning and reproductive health and behaviors; highlight evidence-based practices that increase girls’ enrollment, retention, and participation in school; and provide recommendations for how the health sector can support keeping girls in school.

  3. Aunties for sexual and reproductive health. How unwed young mothers become advocates, teachers and counsellors in Cameroon

    In Cameroon, a girl's Auntie used to be her most trusted confidante, teacher and counsellor on sexual matters. In 2001, GTZ launched the Aunties Programme which borrows from this tradition. Since then, the Programme has recruited more than 6000 unwed young mothers who got pregnant while still in their teens and has given them basic training in sexual and reproductive health. …

  4. Make it matter. 10 key advocacy messages to prevent HIV in girls and young women

    The aim of this guide is to equip its users with key messages, evidence and actions that can be used to advocate effectively on HIV prevention for girls and young women. It recognizes that advocacy needs to be adapted to each country using the methods and channels that work best in a specific context. It also, however, recognizes that any national advocacy work will be most successful if it follows some basic guiding principles.

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