• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 16 results in 0.017 seconds.

Search results

  1. Early marriage, pregnancy and girl child school dropout

    The aim of this review was to present the recent evidence on the impact of early marriage and/or pregnancy on the rates of girl child drop out. It also synthesises evidence that focus on laws, policies and practices that force pregnant girls or new mothers out of school. Although early marriage and pregnancy are often linked to school dropout, evidence proving a direct and causal link is limited. This is because early marriage and pregnancy can be both the cause and consequence of dropping out of school. …

  2. Keeping African girls in school with better sanitary care

    For young girls in developing countries, not knowing how to manage their periods can hinder access to education. Research from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London demonstrates that in rural Uganda, providing free sanitary products and lessons about puberty to girls may increase their attendance at school.

  3. Attention to menstrual hygiene management in schools: An analysis of education policy documents in low- and middle-income countries

    Recent decades have seen a push for gender parity in education in low resource countries. Attention is shifting to how school environments hinder the achievement of gender equality. One effort, primarily led by the water, sanitation and hygiene sector, includes a focus on the needs of menstruating girls.

  4. Girls in control: Compiled findings from studies on menstrual hygiene management of school girls. Ethiopia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe

    SNV launched the five-country Girls in Control menstrual hygiene pilot programme in January 2014, building on insights and experience gained from implementing school-based water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programmes in 14 countries. This report presents the findings of baseline studies on the menstrual hygiene management of schoolgirls, conducted in the five project countries: Ethiopia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

  5. Early and unintended pregnancy: recommendations for the education sector

    Available evidence supports a clear and compelling role for the education sector in preventing early and unintended pregnancy and ensuring the right to education for pregnant and parenting girls.

  6. Do menstrual hygiene management interventions improve education and psychosocial outcomes for women and girls in low and middle income countries? A systematic review

    Background: Unhygienic and ineffective menstrual hygiene management has been documented across low resource contexts and linked to negative consequences for women and girls. Objectives: To summarise and critically appraise evidence for the effectiveness of menstruation management interventions in improving women and girls’ education, work and psychosocial wellbeing in low and middle income countries. [...] Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to establish the effectiveness of menstruation management interventions, although current results are promising. …

  7. A survey on re-entry of pregnant girls in primary and secondary schools in Uganda: survey briefing

    The main objective of the Survey on Re-Entry of Pregnant Girls in Primary and Secondary Schools in Uganda (2011) is to collect evidence and articulate policy options to address the re-integration of pregnant girls and child mothers in school in Uganda. …

  8. Educating girls: Creating a foundation for positive sexual and reproductive health behaviors

    Investments that promote keeping girls in school, particularly in secondary school, have far-reaching and long-term health and development benefits for individuals, families, and communities. The purpose of this brief is to describe the relationship of girls’ education on family planning and reproductive health and behaviors; highlight evidence-based practices that increase girls’ enrollment, retention, and participation in school; and provide recommendations for how the health sector can support keeping girls in school.

  9. Gender based violence in South African schools

    This paper looks at issues of gender-based violence in the education sector in South Africa through a review of literature and statistics of recent research by international organizations.

  10. Addressing cross-generational sex: A desk review of research and programs

    Current interest in cross-generational sex is largely due to the feminization of the HIV and AIDS epidemic. Young women 15-24 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa are three times more likely to be infected with HIV than young men of the same age, four times more likely in Zambia, and a staggering five times more likely in Zimbabwe. But, in fact, ministries of education and others have had curricula and materials addressing the “sugar daddy” phenomenon for many years. …

  11. Education and risky sex in Africa: Unraveling the link between women’s education and reproductive health behaviors in Kenya

    Much research attention has been devoted to understanding the relationship between education and riskier sex-related behaviors and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. While in the early 1990s researchers found that increases in education were associated with a higher incidence of HIV/AIDS, this relationship appears to have reversed and better educated people, especially women, appear less likely to engage in riskier sex-related behaviors and have a lower incidence rate of HIV/AIDS. …

  12. Stop violence against girls in school: a cross country analysis of baseline research from Ghana, Kenya and Mozambique

    This report presents findings from baseline studies carried out in three districts in Kenya, Ghana and Mozambique for Stop Violence Against Girls in School, a five year project (2008­-2013) led by ActionAid with support from the UK’s Big Lottery Fund. …

  13. Women, girls and HIV and AIDS: education, women's economic empowerment and workplace violence

    Today, evidence points indisputably to the important intersection of HIV and gender inequality. In 2010, women and girls accounted for more than half of all people living with HIV (about 52%). They are disproportionately affected by gender-based violence, suffer economic inequalities and shoulder the bulk of the burden of caring for people living with HIV.

  14. EQUATE technical brief: gender, education, and HIV/AIDS

    Education plays a pivotal role in shaping the lives of children and young adults. Yet, schools can be breeding grounds for potentially damaging behaviors that remain with pupils into adulthood. Schools can conversely prove effective in helping young people learn positive and healthy models of behavior by challenging the harmful gender norms that limit academic achievement and increase the likelihood of HIV infection, especially for girls. …

  15. Women and girls living with HIV/AIDS: overview and annotated bibliography

    Women's social, economic, and legal disadvantage is exacerbated by a positive HIV status, and vice versa. This report, prepared at the request of Irish Aid by BRIDGE in collaboration with the International Community of Women Living with HIV and AIDS (ICW), considers the specific challenges faced by women and girls who are living with HIV and AIDS. It consists of an overview, annotated bibliography, and contacts section.

Pages

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.