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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Hear our voices

    Thousands of girls claim they are embarrassed and ashamed to express the everyday injustices and threats of sexual violence they face, in ‘Hear Our Voices’ - one of the largest studies of adolescent girls’ rights of its kind. Plan International spoke directly with more than 7,000 girls and boys aged 12 to 16 in 11 countries across the world, as part of its Because I am a Girl campaign for girls’ rights. The study’s results bring the daily realities of girls into vivid colour. …

  2. Using participatory research and action to address the HIV-related vulnerabilities of adolescent girls in Tanzania

    Globally, girls and young women are more likely to be HIV positive than their male peers, due in large part to an array of gender inequalities that negatively impact their mental and physical well being. Protecting girls from this multi-dimensional risk requires first understanding how the girls experience vulnerability in their daily lives and developing solutions that are actionable within the community context. …

  3. Walking the talk: putting women's rights at the heart of the HIV and AIDS response

    Using research from 13 countries, this report demonstrates that gender inequalities and the persistent and systematic violation of their rights are leaving women and girls disproportionately vulnerable to HIV and AIDS. Poverty and limited access to education and information, discriminatory laws and ingrained gender inequalities all deny women and girls their rights. …

  4. Gender Inequalities in primary Schooling: The roles of poverty and adverse cultural practice

    This paper suggests a simple model for the relationships between poverty, schooling and gender inequality. It argues that poverty at both national and household levels is associated with an under-enrolment of school age children, but that the gendered outcomes of such under enrolment are the product of cultural practice, rather than poverty per se. Using detailed case study material from two African countries, evidence is presented to show the variety and extent of adverse cultural practice which impede the attendance and performance of girls at school, relative to boys. …

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