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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Assessment report of health literacy and behavior change practices among adolescent girls in Kibera

    This report presents the findings of a rapid assessment of ‘Health Literacy and Behavior Change Practiced among Adolescent Girls in Kibera’ Informal Settlement in Nairobi, Kenya.

  2. #WhatWomenWant: a transformative framework for women, girls and gender equality in the context of HIV and sexual and reproductive health and rights

    The report is based on six months of consultations with adolescent girls and young women around the world. It calls for sustained investment in women-led partnerships and civil society in order to advance gender equality and meet the ambitious targets set in the Sustainable Development Goals.

  3. Greentree II: violence against women and girls, and HIV. Report on a high-level consultation on the evidence and implications

    The STRIVE Consortium convened a high level meeting to review evidence on the links between two critical global issues: HIV and violence against women and girls (VAWG) and to identify strategies to address this nexus. The consultation brought together experts from both fields to clarify what is known about the epidemiological pathways linking violence and HIV, and to identify shared risk factors and ways to act on synergies and opportunities for common programming.

  4. On the impact of early marriage on schooling outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa and South West Asia

    This paper examines the effect of age of marriage on women’s schooling outcomes for 36 countries from Sub-Saharan Africa and South West Asia. We employ an instrumental variable approach to account for the endogeneity of early marriage driven by socio-economic and cultural factors. Our results show that delaying early marriage by one year is associated with an increase of half a year of education in Sub- Saharan Africa and nearly one third of a year of education in South West Asia as well as a lower likelihood of dropping out from secondary school of 5.5% in South West Asia.

  5. Feminist Formations

    Articles from this issue : Girls’ schooling, gender equity, and the global education and development agenda: conceptual disconnections, political struggles, and the difficulties of practice, Situating empowerment for millennial schoolgirls in Gujarat, India and Shaanxi, China, engendering agency: the differentiated impact of educational initiatives in Zambia and India, History transformed?: Gender in World War II narratives in U.S. …

  6. Empower young women and adolescent girls: fast-track the end of the AIDS epidemic in Africa

    The purpose of this report is to guide regional and global advocacy and inform political dialogue over the coming year, including in the contexts of the African Union Agenda 2063 and the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. …

  7. Addressing violence against women and girls (VAWG) in education programming. DFID guidance note

    This two-part guidance note is part of a series of DFID guidance notes on VAWG. It focuses specifically on how to address VAWG in education programming, where DFID aims to make progress towards two key impacts: 1. Girls and boys gain valuable knowledge, skills and self-confidence through education in gender-responsive environments free from all forms of violence or threat of violence; 2. Education systems, through formal and informal settings, actively contribute to the development of more gender-equitable societies, where VAWG is not tolerated. …

  8. Educating girls: Creating a foundation for positive sexual and reproductive health behaviors

    Investments that promote keeping girls in school, particularly in secondary school, have far-reaching and long-term health and development benefits for individuals, families, and communities. The purpose of this brief is to describe the relationship of girls’ education on family planning and reproductive health and behaviors; highlight evidence-based practices that increase girls’ enrollment, retention, and participation in school; and provide recommendations for how the health sector can support keeping girls in school.

  9. Hear our voices

    Thousands of girls claim they are embarrassed and ashamed to express the everyday injustices and threats of sexual violence they face, in ‘Hear Our Voices’ - one of the largest studies of adolescent girls’ rights of its kind. Plan International spoke directly with more than 7,000 girls and boys aged 12 to 16 in 11 countries across the world, as part of its Because I am a Girl campaign for girls’ rights. The study’s results bring the daily realities of girls into vivid colour. …

  10. Gender-responsive HIV programming for women and girls

    This guidance note is intended to guide countries on how to include a gender perspective and promote equality and human rights for women and girls in their national HIV responses, drawing upon the latest technical developments, guidelines and investment approaches. The inclusion of a gender perspective for women and girls into national HIV responses is important because they continue to be profoundly affected by HIV. As such, addressing their needs is a prerequisite to effectively responding to the epidemic. …

  11. Because I am a girl: The state of the world's girls 2014. Pathways to power: Creating sustainable change for adolescent girls

    This is the eighth in the annual ‘Because I am a Girl’ report series, published by Plan, which assesses the current state of the world’s girls. While women and children are recognised in policy and planning, girls’ needs and rights are often ignored. The reports provide evidence, including the voices of girls themselves, as to why they need to be treated differently from boys and adult women. They also use information from primary research, in particular a small study set up in 2006 following 142 girls from nine countries. …

  12. Integrating gender and gender-based violence into HIV programs

    The vision of the Mozambique President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Gender-Based Violence Initiative (GBVI) is to reduce incidence of gender-based violence (GBV) and to create a social and institutional environment that protects women and girls and offers services of protection and help to survivors. A joint U.S. Government, Government of Mozambique, and civil society team led and developed the GBVI plan, which was informed by a wide stakeholder consultation held in August 2010. …

  13. The cost and cost-effectiveness of gender-responsive interventions for HIV: a systematic review

    Introduction: Harmful gender norms and inequalities, including gender-based violence, are important structural barriers to effective HIV programming. We assess current evidence on what forms of gender-responsive intervention may enhance the effectiveness of basic HIV programmes and be cost-effective. Methods: Effective intervention models were identified from an existing evidence review (“what works for women”). Based on this, we conducted a systematic review of published and grey literature on the costs and cost-effectiveness of each intervention identified. …

  14. What HIV programs work for adolescent girls?

    Background: Adolescent girls face unique challenges in reducing their risk of acquiring HIV because of gender inequalities, but much of HIV programming and evaluation lacks a specific focus on female adolescents. Methods: This article, based on a review of 150 studies and evaluations from 2001 to June 2013, reviews evidence on programming for adolescents that is effective for girls or could be adapted to be effective for girls. Results: The evidence suggests specific interventions for adolescent girls across 3 critical areas: (1) an enabling environment, including keeping girls in school …

  15. Strengthening the enabling environment for women and girls: what is the evidence in social and structural approaches in the HIV response?

    There is growing interest in expanding public health approaches that address social and structural drivers that affect the environment in which behaviour occurs. Half of those living with HIV infection are women. The sociocultural and political environment in which women live can enable or inhibit their ability to protect themselves from acquiring HIV. …

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