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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. They are destroying our futures: Sexual violence against girls in Zambia's schools

    This report examines the problem of sexual violence against girls in Zambian schools. In Zambia, many girls are raped, sexually abused, harassed, and assaulted by teachers and male classmates. They are also subjected to sexual harassment and attack while travelling to and from school. Such abuse is a devastating and often overlooked manifestation of the gender-based violence that occurs in numerous settings in Zambia and other countries throughout the world. …

  2. Programs to address child marriage: Framing the problem

    Child marriage violates girls’ human rights and adversely affects their health and well-being. While age at marriage is increasing in most regions of the developing world, early marriage persists for large populations. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one out of three women aged 20–24 were married before age 18, and one out of seven were married before age 15. There is great variation in child marriage practices across and within regions and between ethnic and religious groups. Eradicating child marriage has long been on the agenda of the United Nations and of individual countries. …

  3. Addressing sexual violence and HIV risk among married adolescent girls in rural Nyanza, Kenya

    HIV infection is much higher among adolescent girls in sub-Saharan Africa than among boys. In settings such as Nyanza Province, Kenya, rates of HIV infection are extremely high, and evidence is increasing in some settings that girls who are married are much more likely to be infected with HIV, compared with their unmarried sexually active counterparts. This brief describes a program addressing the problem of sexual violence and the risk of HIV transmission within marriage in Kenya's Nyanza Province. …

  4. The establishment of a National Coalition on Women, Girls and AIDS

    The Network of Non-Governmental Organizations of Trinidad and Tobago for the Advancement of Women (The Network) has been contracted by the United Nations in Trinidad and Tobago to execute this Project: “Formation of a National Coalition on Women and Girls and AIDS. The project entails: a mapping of organizations working on women, girls and AIDS in Trinidad and Tobago; and the development of a structure and three year work plan for the coalition in consultation with national partners. …

  5. Vijana tunaweza Newala: findings from a participatory research and action project in Tanzania

    Globally, girls and young women are more likely to be hiV-positive than their male peers, due in large part to an array of gender inequalities that negatively impact their their mental and physical well being. The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) and Taasisi ya Maendeleo Shirikishi Arusha (TAMASHA), in collaboration with Pact Tanzania, developed a participatory research and action project (Vitu Newala) that aimed to both understand and respond to girls’ HIV-related vulnerabilities. …

  6. Globalization and women's vulnerabilities to HIV and AIDS

    This paper - largely inspired by Colleen O'Manique's analysis in her article "Globalization and gendered vulnerabilities to HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa" - seeks to uncover some of the eff ects of the global political economy on women's vulnerability to HIV and AIDS. Using as a base C. …

  7. What works for women and girls: evidence for HIV/AIDS interventions

    The purpose of www.whatworksforwomen.org is to compile and summarize the base of evidence to support successful interventions in HIV programming for women and girls. National AIDS programs, government ministries, implementing partners, donors, civil society groups and others need an easy-to-understand format for identifying what works for women. …

  8. Gender Based Violence and HIV/AIDS in Cambodia: Links, Opportunities and Potential Responses

    There is growing evidence from different countries that gender based violence can increase the risk of HIV/AIDS as well as be an outcome of HIV/AIDS. Researchers, focusing on understanding the explosion of the HIV/AIDS epidemic among women and girls, have highlighted how sexual coercion and fear of violence limit women's ability to negotiate safe sex behaviors such as condom use and reduced number of partners, access services, and/or adopt practices to prevent mother to child transmission. …

  9. The short-term impacts of a schooling conditional cash transfer program on the sexual behaviour of young women

    Recent evidence suggests that conditional cash transfer programs for schooling are effective in raising school enrollment and attendance. However, there is also reason to believe that such programs can affect other outcomes, such as the sexual behavior of their young beneficiaries. Zomba Cash Transfer Program is a randomized, ongoing conditional cash transfer intervention targeting young women in Malawi that provides incentives (in the form of school fees and cash transfers) to current schoolgirls and recent dropouts to stay in or return to school. …

  10. Start with a girl. A new agenda for global health. A girls count report on adolescent girls

    Start with a Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health sheds light on the realities of girls' health and wellbeing in developing countries, on the links between the health of girls and the prospects for their families, and on the specific actions that will improve health prospects for millions. This report describes the most prevalent and serious health problems adolescent girls face in developing countries, linking them to a combination of specific public-health risks and social determinants of health. …

  11. Addressing the vulnerability of young women and girls to stop the HIV epidemic in southern Africa

    The papers explore some of the factors that are driving the current epidemic in southern Africa. These include the practice of age disparate and intergenerational sex; biological vulnerability of young women; economic empowerment; education and gender-based violence. A final paper examines the complex interaction between environmental factors and individual choices, behaviours and community norms.

  12. Gender equality, HIV, and AIDS: a challenge for the education sector

    The book shows that while gender inequalities in society generally, and particularly within the education sector, are driving aspects of the HIV epidemic, educational settings can be empowering and bring about change. It examines different expectations of what HIV education programmes and education settings can do to transform unequal gender relations and protect young people against HIV and AIDS and contribute to care for those affected and infected. …

  13. Scaling up for zero tolerance: civil society leadership in eliminating violence against women and girls in Ghana, Rwanda, and South Africa

    Based on the Global AIDS Alliance's August 2006 report Zero Tolerance: Stop the Violence Against Women and Children, Stop HIV/AIDS, this report explores successes and challenges of scaling up comprehensive national programs to prevent, respond to, and mitigate the impacts of violence against women and girls (VAW/G) and violence against children (VAC). The countries selected for the study - Ghana, Rwanda, and South Africa - demonstrate concerted efforts to address the problem. …

  14. Zero tolerance: stop the violence against women and children, stop HIV/AIDS

    This document describes a framework for a comprehensive response to violence against women and children, including the resources that would be needed, political and financial, for full implementation. It suggests taking into account the following pillars: 1. Political commitment and resource mobilization, 2. Legal and judicial reform, 3. Health sector reform, 4. Education sector reform, 5. Community mobilization for zero tolerance, 6. Mass marketing for social change.

  15. Gender achievements and prospects in education. The GAP Report: part one

    On 1 January 2006, the world will wake up to a deadline missed. The Millennium Development Goal - gender parity in primary and secondary education by 2005 - will remain unmet. What is particularly disheartening is that this was a realistic deadline and a reachable goal. The tragedy of this failure is that an unthinkable number of children, the majority of whom are girls, have been abandoned to a bleak future.The GAP report, a multimedia project, is more than a wake-up call. …

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