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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Girl power: the impact of girls' education on HIV and sexual behaviour

    Girl Power shows that, early in the epidemic (before 1995), more highly educated women were more vulnerable to HIV than women who were less well educated. The most likely reason is that more highly educated people had better economic prospects, which influenced their lifestyle choices such as mobility and number of sexual partners. At that stage, there was also a general information vacuum about HIV and AIDS in Africa.However, as the epidemic has evolved, the relationship between girls' education and HIV has also changed. …

  2. Gender achievements and prospects in education. The GAP Report: part one

    On 1 January 2006, the world will wake up to a deadline missed. The Millennium Development Goal - gender parity in primary and secondary education by 2005 - will remain unmet. What is particularly disheartening is that this was a realistic deadline and a reachable goal. The tragedy of this failure is that an unthinkable number of children, the majority of whom are girls, have been abandoned to a bleak future.The GAP report, a multimedia project, is more than a wake-up call. …

  3. Facing the future together: Report of the Secretary General's Task Force on Women, Girls and HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa

    For several months in 2003, the Secretary General's Task Force on Women, Girls and HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa engaged in intensive on-the-ground consultations in the nine countries in the sub-region with the highest HIV prevalence rates - Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

  4. Educate girls fight AIDS

    Growing evidence shows that getting and keeping young people in school, particularly girls, dramatically lowers their vulnerability to HIV. By itself, merely attending primary school makes young people significantly less likely to contract HIV. When young people stay in school through the secondary level, education's protective effect against HIV is even more pronounced. …

  5. Female sex worker HIV prevention projects: lessons learnt from Papua New Guinea, India and Bangladesh

    The importance of designing and implementing successful targeted interventions for sex workers as part of HIV prevention and control cannot be over-emphasised. In almost every country, sex workers comprise a focal point of the epidemic. They are the victims of discrimination, often violently intense, trafficking, legal persecution and societal ambivalence as well as one of the first occupational groups to become heavily infected. The infection passes from sex workers back to their clients and into the general population of women, men and children. One of the clearest public health lessons emerging from the HIV pandemic is that protecting the human rights of sex workers is an important means of prevention.

  6. Gender Inequalities in primary Schooling: The roles of poverty and adverse cultural practice

    This paper suggests a simple model for the relationships between poverty, schooling and gender inequality. It argues that poverty at both national and household levels is associated with an under-enrolment of school age children, but that the gendered outcomes of such under enrolment are the product of cultural practice, rather than poverty per se. Using detailed case study material from two African countries, evidence is presented to show the variety and extent of adverse cultural practice which impede the attendance and performance of girls at school, relative to boys. …

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