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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Adolescent sexual and reproductive health programs in humanitarian settings: an in-depth look at family planning services

    This report summarizes findings and recommendations of a year-long exercise undertaken by the Women’s Refugee Commission and Save the Children - in partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to map existing adolescent sexual and reproductive health programs and document good practices. The work was accomplished through a practitioner survey and humanitarian funding analyses; key informant interviews; and collection of good practice case studies.

  2. Regional consultation on sexuality education and gender with a focus on reaching adolescent girls. Meeting report

    In July 2011, UNFPA, UNESCO and UNICEF jointly organised the Asia Pacific Regional Consultation on Sexuality Education and Gender, with a Special Focus on Adolescent Girls. The meeting offered a platform for countries to share their evidence and experience and gain information and tools on how to effectively invest resources in sexuality education programs and policies. There was a special focus on how to reach adolescent girls – both in terms of sexuality education but also in wider development priorities. …

  3. A Win for Women is a Win for All

    UNDP is leading a UNAIDS and UNIFEM interagency initiative “Universal Access Now!” to accelerate universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support for women and girls in countries where women are most affected by HIV. This is the third update on this initiatives which focuses on human rights aspects and draws out early lessons learned from the initiative.

  4. Women hold up half the sky - and half the burden of the HIV epidemic

    The HIV burden on women is dramatically higher in some regions, certain age groups and among marginalized groups, such as female sex workers. Women’s vulnerability to HIV is exacerbated by gender inequality and domestic violence. The global effort towards elimination of paediatric HIV and keeping mothers alive deserves applause. However, the needs of women go beyond their child-bearing age or potentials and/or reproductive desires and must be recognized in the global HIV agenda. In particular, more female-controlled prevention tools are urgently required to allow women to protect themselves.

  5. Impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviour of female students in Nigerian schools: Policy implications for scientific and technolgical development

    This study investigated the impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviors of female students in senior secondary schools in Rivers State of Nigeria. The population for the study comprised of all senior secondary schools female students in Nigeria, which was divided into urban and rural schools. The sample size was 200 female students obtained by using stratified random sampling technique. …

  6. Gender violence in schools: taking the 'girls-as-victims' discourse forward

    This paper draws attention to the gendered nature of violence in schools. Recent recognition that schools can be violent places has tended to ignore the fact that many such acts originate in unequal and antagonistic gender relations, which are tolerated and ‘normalised’ by everyday school structures and processes. …

  7. Women out loud: How women living with HIV will help the world end AIDS

    Women may make up half the world’s population, but they do not share it equally. This is especially evident when it comes to HIV. Half of all people living with HIV are women, yet many are underserved or do not know their status. Despite the many successes we have seen, women still face inequalities that will keep the AIDS response from reaching its full potential.

  8. They are destroying our futures: Sexual violence against girls in Zambia's schools

    This report examines the problem of sexual violence against girls in Zambian schools. In Zambia, many girls are raped, sexually abused, harassed, and assaulted by teachers and male classmates. They are also subjected to sexual harassment and attack while travelling to and from school. Such abuse is a devastating and often overlooked manifestation of the gender-based violence that occurs in numerous settings in Zambia and other countries throughout the world. …

  9. HIV prevalence among high school learners - opportunities for schools-based HIV testing programmes and sexual reproductive health services

    Young girls in sub Saharan Africa are reported to have higher rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared to boys in the same age group. Knowledge of HIV status amongst high schools learners provides an important gateway to prevention and treatment services. This study aimed at determining the HIV prevalence and explored the feasibility of HIV testing among high school learners. Between September 2010 and February 2011, a linked, anonymous cross-sectional survey was conducted in two public sector high schools in the rural KwaZulu-Natal midlands. …

  10. Universal Access for Women and Girls: Accelerating Access to HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support for Female Sex Workers and Wives of Migrant Men

    As part of a global initiative to improve women’s access to HIV prevention and treatment services, ICRW implemented a research study to expand the evidence base on access to services for two key populations in India: female sex workers in Pune, Maharashtra and wives of migrant men in Ganjam, Orissa. The main objectives of the research study were to explore barriers to HIV services experienced by the study populations, and based on the findings, to identify entry points for improving HIV services among women in India more broadly.

  11. Jamaican Mothers' Influences of Adolescent Girls' Sexual Beliefs and Behaviors

    The purpose of this study was to identify the ways in which urban Jamaican mothers influence their adolescent daughters' sexual beliefs and behaviors in order to incorporate them into the design of a family-based, HIV risk-reduction intervention program. Focus groups were conducted with forty-six 14- to 18-year-old adolescent girls and 30 mothers or female guardians of adolescent girls recruited from community-based organizations in and around Kingston and St. Andrew, Jamaica. Separate focus groups were held with mothers and daughters; each included 6 to 10 participants. …

  12. Sexual and reproductive health communication between mothers and their adolescent daughters in northern Nigeria

    The authors conducted structured interviews and focus groups to investigate reproductive health (RH) communication practices among 184 mother–daughter pairs in Ungogo, northern Nigeria. Transcripts were analyzed using the grounded theory approach. A total of 136 mothers reported discussing RH issues with their daughters. The majority of daughters acquired RH education from their mothers. Parents were more likely to discuss marriage, menstruation, courtship, premarital sex, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) than other sex education topics. …

  13. Self-reported sexual behaviour among adolescent girls in Uganda: reliability of data debated

    The objective of this study was to compare self-reported information about sexual behavior in a research interview to information retrieved during a clinical consultation. Social workers interviewed 595 sexually experienced women below 20 years about genital symptoms and sexual behavior. A midwife interviewed and examined the women and took vaginal samples for gonorrhea and chlamydia. Four questions were embedded in both the social workers' interviews and among the midwife's questions. …

  14. Spotlight on Gender: Evidence-Based Approaches to Protecting Adolescent Girls at Risk of HIV

    Despite decades of investment in HIV prevention, a large and vulnerable population—that of adolescent girls—remains invisible, underserved, and at disproportionate risk of HIV. Given the changing shape of the epidemic and the leveling off or shrinking of resources, there is an urgent need to rebalance HIV investments between treatment and prevention and to develop evidence-based approaches for protecting the large and vulnerable populations of adolescent girls who remain at risk of HIV. This paper outlines a stepwise engagement process for improving girls’ lives and reducing their HIV risk.

  15. Minding the gap in Alexandria: Talking to girls in schools about reproductive health

    Reproductive health (RH) is one of the cornerstones of an individual’s health and well-being, and an important component of a country’s human social development. Limited access to RH information among female adolescents can increase their vulnerability to health problems. Therefore, it is important to provide them with accurate and age-appropriate information. In the Middle East and North Africa, cultural norms dictate that girls should not be exposed to information about RH until they are married. …

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