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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Girls can't wait: why girls' education matters, and how to make it happen now

    This is the year that the world will miss the first, and most critical of all the Millennium Development Goals - gender parity in education by 2005. Over the next decade, unless world leaders take drastic action now, unacceptably slow progress on girls' education will account for over 10 million unnecessary child and maternal deaths, will cost poor countries as much as 3 percentage points in lost economic growth, and lead to at least 3.5 million avoidable cases of HIV/AIDS. …

  2. Gender achievements and prospects in education. The GAP Report: part one

    On 1 January 2006, the world will wake up to a deadline missed. The Millennium Development Goal - gender parity in primary and secondary education by 2005 - will remain unmet. What is particularly disheartening is that this was a realistic deadline and a reachable goal. The tragedy of this failure is that an unthinkable number of children, the majority of whom are girls, have been abandoned to a bleak future.The GAP report, a multimedia project, is more than a wake-up call. …

  3. Facing the future together: Report of the Secretary General's Task Force on Women, Girls and HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa

    For several months in 2003, the Secretary General's Task Force on Women, Girls and HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa engaged in intensive on-the-ground consultations in the nine countries in the sub-region with the highest HIV prevalence rates - Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

  4. Gender Inequalities in primary Schooling: The roles of poverty and adverse cultural practice

    This paper suggests a simple model for the relationships between poverty, schooling and gender inequality. It argues that poverty at both national and household levels is associated with an under-enrolment of school age children, but that the gendered outcomes of such under enrolment are the product of cultural practice, rather than poverty per se. Using detailed case study material from two African countries, evidence is presented to show the variety and extent of adverse cultural practice which impede the attendance and performance of girls at school, relative to boys. …

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